Swimming

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 03:47
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Swimming Hero
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Swimming Preview Card
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
77
Silver Medals
73
Gold Medals
66
Sport Introduction

Australia and Olympic Swimming

The first Australian Olympic swimmer was Freddy Lane in Paris 1900. Swimming in the River Seine, Lane won the 200 metres freestyle and the obstacle race over the same distance. The next gold medals came in Stockholm 1912 when Sarah “Fanny” Durack and Wilhelmina “Mina” Wylie finished first and second in the inaugural women’s swimming race, the 100m freestyle. The Australasian team comprising Australians Cecil Healy, Harold Hardwick and Leslie Boardman and New Zealander Malcolm Champion won the men’s 4 x 200m freestyle relay.

At Paris 1924 Andrew “Boy” Charlton shattered the world record on the way to becoming the first of a long line of Australians to win the 1500m freestyle. Eight years later, Clare Dennis became the first Australian to win a medal in a non-freestyle swimming event when she won the women’s 200m breaststroke at Los Angeles 1932. The next gold medal came twenty years later in Helsinki when John Davies won the 200m breaststroke.

Melbourne 1956 saw Australia become the world’s top swimming nation by winning eight gold medals, including every freestyle event. The men’s winners were Jon Henricks (100m), Murray Rose (400m and 1500m) and the men’s 4 x 200m relay team of Henricks, Rose, John Devitt and Kevin O’Halloran. In the women’s events, Dawn Fraser won the 100m, Lorraine Crapp won the 400m and the team of Fraser, Crapp, Faith Leech and Sandra Morgan won the 4 x 100m relay. David Theile won the first of his two 100m backstroke gold medals. At Rome 1960 Fraser, Theile and Rose, in the 400m, repeated their Melbourne victories. John Devitt won the 100m freestyle and Jon Konrads the 1500m freestyle.

Dawn Fraser won the women's 100m freestyle for an unprecedented third time at Tokyo 1964 and Ian O’Brien (200m breaststroke), Kevin Berry (200m butterfly) and Robert Windle (1500m freestyle) also returned with gold medals. The rarefied atmosphere in Mexico City 1968 didn’t stop Michael Wenden taking on and beating the powerful Americans in the 100m and 200m freestyle. Lyn McClements was also a winner, in the women’s 100m butterfly.

At Munich 1972, Shane Gould dominated with medals in five individual events. Gould won the 200m and 400m freestyle and the 200m individual medley, took silver in the 800m and bronze in the 100m freestyle. Other winners in Munich were Gail Neall in the women’s 400m individual medley and Beverley Whitfield in the women’s 200m breaststroke. Brad Cooper won the men’s 400m freestyle after the original winner, Rick DeMont of the United States, was disqualified for taking a prohibited substance in his asthma medication.

Michelle Ford beat the powerful East German women to win the 800m freestyle at Moscow 1980. The men’s 4 x 100m medley team of Mark Kerry, Peter Evans, Mark Tonelli and Neil Brooks also won gold, gold, gold!  "Lucky lane 6" saw Jon Sieben win the 200m butterfly at Los Angeles 1984 and Duncan Armstrong do likewise in the 200m freestyle at Seoul 1988.

Kieren Perkins won the 1500m at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996. In finishing first in the 200m butterfly in Atlanta, Susie O’Neill became the first Australian woman since Michelle Ford to win an Olympic swimming title.

Sydney 2000 saw Australia return to the top echelon of Olympic swimming nations when five gold medals were won. Individual winners were Ian Thorpe (400m freestyle), Grant Hackett (1500m freestyle) and Susie O’Neill (200m freestyle). Relay titles came in the men’s 4 x 200m freestyle with Thorpe, Michael Klim, William Kirby and Todd Pearson and the men’s 4 x 100m freestyle with Thorpe, Klim, Chris Fydler and Ashley Callus.

Australian women dominated as a world swimming power at Athens 2004 with Jodie Henry winning the 100m freestyle and Petria Thomas the 100m butterfly together with relay wins in the 4 x 100m freestyle (Alice Mills, Libby Lenton, Thomas, Henry) and the 4 x 100m medley (Giaan Rooney, Leisel Jones, Thomas, Henry). In the men’s events, Ian Thorpe won the 200m and 400m freestyle titles to become Australia's greatest Olympic gold medal-winner with five, and Grant Hackett repeated his Sydney win in the 1500m. Overall Australia won 15 swimming medals (7 gold, 5 silver, 3 bronze).

Australia was again a dominant force at Beijing, taking a host of medals in the iconic 'Water Cube' venue. Stephanie Rice was one of the stars, taking three gold medals in the two individual medley events and the women's 4 x 200m freestyle (alongside Linda MacKenzie, Kylie Palmer and Bronte Barratt). The women also claimed gold in the 4 x 100m medley relay in a new world record (Emily Seebohm, Jess Schipper, Libby Trickett, Leisel Jones). Jones then took her total Olympic medal haul to eight, winning two gold and one silver with Trickett and Schipper also adding to their swags of medals. In the men's events there were no gold medals but some hard fought silvers went to Grant Hackett in the 1500m freestyle, Eamon Sullivan in the 100m freestyle, Brenton Rickard in the 200m breaststroke and the 4 x 100m medley relay team.

Australia’s gold in the pool at the London 2012 Games came from the women’s 4x100m freestyle relay team. Alicia Coutts, Cate Campbell, Brittany Elmslie and Melanie Schlanger raced the final on the opening night of competition in London.

Coutts and the Australians also won silver in the 4x100m medley and 4x200m freestyle relays, with the men’s 4x100m medley relay claiming bronze. Coutts was the star of the pool also winning silver in the 200m individual medley and bronze in the 100m butterfly. Australia’s other individual medallists in swimming were Christian Sprenger (silver - 100m breaststroke), James Magnussen (silver - 100m freestyle), Emily Seebohm (silver - 100m backstroke) and Bronte Barratt (bronze - 200m freestyle) to take the medal tally at the pool to 10 (1 gold, 6 silver, 3 bronze).

The Australian Swimming Team wrapped up their 2016 Olympic campaign with a total of 10 medals. Mack Horton won the first gold medal of the Games in the men’s 400m freestyle. The other individual gold went to 18-year-old debutant Kyle Chalmers who was in seventh place at the half way mark of the men’s 100m freestyle, before unleashing a whirlwind finish to become Australia’s youngest Olympic Swimming Champion since Ian Thorpe in 2000.

2016: Australia's Swimming Highlights

Other individual medals went to Mitch Larking who won silver in the 200m backstroke, Madeline Groves won silver in the women’s 200m butterfly and Emma McKeon won bronze in the women’s 100m butterfly. The team won medals in five of the six relays; gold in the women’s 4x100m freestyle, silver in the women’s 4x100m medley and in the women’s 4x200m free, bronze in the men’s 4x100m free, and in the men’s 4x100m medley.

A notable mention to Jarrod Poort who sprinted from the gun of the men’s 10km marathon open water race at Copacabana to open up a lead of almost a minute at the 2.5km mark. He held onto the lead for the first 9km of the event, before it unraveled for Poort and the pack eventually swallowed him up as he finished in 21st place.

Olympic History

Swimming has featured in every edition of the Games since 1896. Early Olympic events were conducted in freestyle (crawl) or breaststroke. Backstroke was added as of 1904. In the 1940s, breaststrokers discovered they could go much faster by bringing both arms overhead together. This was soon banned in the breaststroke, but became the butterfly stroke, which is now the fourth stroke used in competitive swimming.

Sport Format

Men and women now compete in 17 events each, involving four different strokes across a range of distances. Freestyle races cover 50m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m (women only), 1500m (men only) and 10km. The butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke races each cover 100m and 200m. All four strokes are used in the 200m and 400m individual medley events. The 4 x 100m freestyle, 4 x 200m freestyle and 4 x 100m medley relays complete the program.

Each race has a maximum of eight swimmers. Preliminary heats in the 50m, 100m and 200m lead to semi-finals and finals based on the fastest times. In relays and individual events of 400m or more, the eight fastest finishers in the preliminaries advance directly to the finals.

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Surfing

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 03:05
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Surfing
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Surfing Preview Card
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
0
Silver Medals
0
Gold Medals
0
Sport Introduction

Australia and Olympic Surfing

Ever since Hawaiian surfing legend Duke Kahanamoku hit Australian shores in 1915 surfing has exploded, becoming an iconic part of the national sporting landscape as well as a part of this nation’s way of life. With its deep connection to the Australian national identity, we have a storied history of success in the sport, with world champions inspiring more and more Australians to get involved.

At the first ever World Surfing Championship in 1964, held at Manly Beach in NSW, Australia took out both the men’s and women’s titles, with Midget Farrelly and Phyllis O’Donnell creating history to become surfing’s first world champions. This set a precedent that would continue into the modern day, with Australia consistently producing competitors of the highest calibre.

Aussie men have performed well throughout the sport’s history, producing several world champions. Mark Richards was the first Australian multiple title winner, taking out each of the championships from 1979 to 1983. He was followed by Tom Carroll, Damien Hardman, Mark Occhilupo and most recently, Mick Fanning and Joel Parkinson. Of these, Fanning is the most renowned. Fanning has won three world titles, his first coming in 2007, and is an icon in Australia, his stature in the country cemented by a close encounter with a shark during a competition in 2015.

While the Aussie men have enjoyed plenty of success, Australian women have done even better. Layne Beachley was one of the nation’s most dominant athletes in any sport winning seven of nine world championships, including six consecutively from 1998 to 2003. Beachley has been inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame and the Sport Australia Hall of Fame and, along with Fanning, has been appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia. Taking the torch from Beachley, Steph Gilmore has carved out an equally impressive career, producing six world titles from 2007 to 2014. The Aussie women have won 15 of the last 20 world championships with Australia’s newest champion, 22-year-old Tyler Wright, taking out the 2016 World Surf League Tour Championship.

Surfing will debut at Tokyo 2020 and in keeping with Australia’s rich history of success, we will be hoping for big things from our athletes.

The competition will take place at Japan’s Tsurigasaki Beach, located in the Greater Tokyo Area, Chiba Prefecture. The beach is an hour train ride from Tokyo and is already a popular spot for locals and travellers. It has previously been used as a competition site. 

Sport Format

Surfing is scored by a panel of judges, who measure a surfer’s ride by analysing the degree of difficulty, level of innovation, and the number and intricacy of manoeuvres performed on each ride. Each surfer is free to catch as many waves as they can within the allotted time and their two highest scores are totalled to calculate his/her final score. The winner is the person who scores the most points.

Given the dependence on catching waves in natural surf conditions, the ability of a competitor to read and adapt to the conditions is crucial to their success.

To earn a high score, a rider must perform with fluidity and grace, while also attacking waves with speed and power. The combination of these two seemingly conflicting properties makes for one of the most exciting spectator sports in the world today. 

Sport Climbing

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 02:47
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Sports Climbing
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Sport Climbing Preview
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
0
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0
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0
Sport Introduction

Australia and Sport Climbing

There are over 300,000 Australians climbing at indoor sport climbing gyms around the country. The total number of competitive climbers registered with Sport Climbing Australia has tripled in the past seven years, and there are now approximately 1,200 competition climbing members, with the sport steadily growing at competitive and amateur levels.

Australia has had a few World Cup finalists over the years in the boulder discipline. The first to make this level was Samantha Berry. Berry was the Australian Champion for six years, the Asian X Games winner three times, and a four-time Oceania Cup title holder. James Kassay, the current National Boulder Champion, and Chris Webb-Parsons have also made World Cup finals.

Other athletes making their mark on the climbing scene include 18-year-old Campbell Harrison, the current national Open and Junior Men’s Lead Champion, Claire Langmore, the Female National Lead and Boulder Champion, Lucy Stirling, the reigning Oceania Lead Champion since 2013 and two-time World Cup participant and Roxy Perry, the current National Speed and Lead Champion

Olympic History

Tokyo 2020 is the first time Sports Climbing will be included in the Olympic programme.

Sport Format

In sport climbing, athletes compete in three disciplines: lead climbing, bouldering and speed climbing. At the Olympic Games each climber is required to compete in all three disciplines and the final ranking is determined by the combined results of the three disciplines.

Lead climbing is a height and distance competition within an eight-minute time frame. Athletes climb a fixed course on an overhanging wall. The further along the wall they travel, the more difficult the course becomes and therefore the aim is to cover the longest distance without falling off, or in the specific time frame.

In bouldering, athletes climb fixed routes on a wall of 5 metres or less. A round includes four or five sets of boulder problems/walls and climbers have a fixed amount of time to attempt each wall. Competitors are ranked by the number of walls they complete within the timeframe, with ties settled by the total number of attempts taken to solve the walls. Therefore, since climbers may keep trying to climb each route as long as it is within the time frame, it is important to climb in the least number of attempts as possible.

Speed climbing is a sprint race where athletes climb a fixed route on a 15-metre wall with holds. Climbers are informed in advance about the arrangement of the holds, and the climber with the fastest time wins.

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Winter

Submitted by admin on Tue, 05/07/2019 - 00:07
Sport Season Introduction

The first Winter Olympic Games, Chamonix 1924, had six sports on the program and 16 events. Today the number of sports has only increased by one to seven with multiple disciplines in bobsleigh, skating and skiing. At the 2014 Games in Sochi Russia - alpine parrallel team skiing, snowboard and ski slopestyle were added meaning 98 events were contested.

Since Athens 1896, there have been many changes to the sports on the summer Olympic program. There were 28 sports contested at Rio 2016 with the addition of golf and rugby 7s. Five new sports will join the programme at Tokyo 2020, with karate, surfing and sports climbing

Summer

Submitted by admin on Tue, 05/07/2019 - 00:05
Sport Season Introduction

Since Athens 1896, there have been many changes to the sports on the summer Olympic program. There were 28 sports contested at Rio 2016 with the addition of golf and rugby 7s. Four new sports will join the programme at Tokyo 2020 with surfing, skateboarding, sports climbing and karate making their Olympic debuts, while baseball and softball are returning to the programme after a hiatus since Beijing 2008. Aquatics, canoe/kayak, cycling, gymnastics, equestrian, volleyball and wrestling have multiple disciplines. Learn more on each sports page.

Use what you have

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/06/2019 - 23:52
Trivia Introduction

Downhill skiers used to make their skis from moose antlers.

Age is no barrier

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/06/2019 - 23:43
Trivia Introduction

Three Olympians completed before their 14th birthdays while three athletes completed after turning 60.

Key appointments to leadership teams for Tokyo 2020 & other Games announced

Submitted by admin on Fri, 05/03/2019 - 09:14
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​​​​Susie O'Neill
Article Introduction

Olympic Games Gold medallists Susie O’Neill and Kim Brennan have been announced as Deputy Chefs de Mission for the Australian Olympic Team to compete at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games. The pair join Olympic fencer Evelyn Halls in the key roles, rounding out Chef de Mission Ian Chesterman’s leadership team for the Games.

Content

Additionally, New South Wales Institute of Sport CEO Kevin Thompson has been appointed as Head of Performance Services.

The appointments were confirmed at the AOC Executive Meeting in Sydney today. 

AOC President John Coates AC says he’s pleased Chef de Mission Ian Chesterman has such solid support behind him.

“Each of these Olympians has special qualities to contribute to the Team environment and each will bring their own experience and perspective. They will prove a very important resource for Ian,” Coates said.  

Tokyo 2020 Chef de Mission Ian Chesterman says the Deputy roles are critical in ensuring that the athletes’ needs come first.

“We are focused on giving our athletes the very best opportunity to perform at their best. Our three Deputies totally understand the environment of Olympic competition, and will be a great support to our athletes and coaches in the team.

“It is very exciting to have such a high calibre group together. Each brings something different but each has a fantastic work ethic and great empathy for what’s important to athletes,” Chesterman said.

Winner of eight Olympic medals, Susie O’Neill AM says it’s a privilege to again be part of the wonderful energy of an Olympic team.

“I’m hoping that I can provide that reassurance to the younger athletes. When they see that I am just an everyday person, they can believe in themselves and that anything is possible,” O’Neill said.

Rio single scull Gold medallist Kim Brennan AM says to be contributing to the Team effort so soon after retirement is exciting.

Kim Brennan

“Every Olympian wants to keep contributing in one way or another. We have that bond. To be stepping into this role gives me the chance to make a different type of contribution,” Brennan said.

Olympic fencer from the Sydney and Athens Games Evelyn Halls says it’s an honour to be able to contribute in Tokyo.

“Undertaking the role of Chef de Mission for our Youth Olympic Team in Buenos Aires last year gave me a great appreciation of the difference you can make for our young athletes. To see that young team meld as a unit and really perform to their best was very satisfying,” Halls said.

Evelyn Halls

Kevin Thompson says he’s very excited and privileged to be involved with the Australian Team for the Tokyo Olympics.

“Leading a team to deliver HQ performance support services whilst working closely with Dr David Hughes and his medical team is a great opportunity. I look forward to the challenge of the Games and working through the requirements of each sport to support them in optimising athlete performances,” Thompson said.

The Australian Olympic Committee also announced the Chefs de Mission to lead Team Australia at the upcoming Pacific Games, San Diego World Beach Games and Winter Youth Olympic Games.

Olympic kayaker Kenny Wallace OAM, sports administrator John Boultbee AM and Winter Olympian moguls skier Ramone Cooper will lead Australian teams at the Pacific Games, San Diego World Beach Games and Winter Youth Olympic Games respectively.

Three-time Olympian and Beijing 2008 gold medallist Wallace will lead the team at July’s Pacific Games in Apia, Samoa, which will pit Australia against 3000 athletes from 22 Pacific nations.

“If athletes can immerse themselves in the multi-sport environment and be part of a strong Australian team culture it will have an ongoing benefit, not only at the Pacific Games but in future Games as well as away from the sporting arena.”

Ken Wallace

The inaugural San Diego World Beach Games in October 2019 will see athletes compete across 17 disciplines, including sports making their Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 like surfing, sport climbing and 3x3 basketball.

Boultbee, current head of high performance at Volleyball Australia has overseen sport at the highest level, including as Director of the Australian Institute of Sport from 1995 to 2001 and in roles across rowing, football and volleyball.

“The World Beach Games are an exciting new concept on the Olympic scene and a great opportunity for a number of sports to get competition and profile that often doesn’t come their way,” Boultbee said.

Lausanne, Switzerland will host the 3rd edition of the Winter Youth Olympics in January 2020, with Australia set to take on almost 2000 athletes from 80 countries.

Vancouver 2010 moguls skier Cooper is excited to lead a team in his new home of Lausanne, where he works for the World Academy of Sport.

“It’s a privilege to be named to any Australian Olympic Team, and to be able to take on this role in my new adopted ‘home town’ of Lausanne is special,” Cooper said.

olympics.com.au

Tahli Moore - The curveball that changed my life

Submitted by admin on Tue, 04/23/2019 - 15:17
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Tahli Moore Aussie Spirit Debut - Softball Australia
Article Introduction

SOFTBALL: Softballer Tahli Moore was on the cusp of reaching the prime of her career, before she was dealt both a career and life-threatening blow, leaving the game she loved completely off-limits.

Content

Receiving a US scholarship, competing in a junior world cup and travelling the world to hone her craft, Moore's dream of playing for Australia was well on track. That was until her world was turned upside down by a dangerous blood clot.

Now, the tenacious athlete opens up about her experience, as she sets her sights on Tokyo 2020.

Moore’s softball journey began fifteen years ago, as soon as she was able to hold a bat. Following in the footsteps of her mother, Anne-Marie, the self-professed “Mummy’s girl” said she was inspired not only by the game of softball, but by seeing the great friendships her mum had formed through the sport.

“My mum and sister both played softball so I literally grew up playing in a shopping trolley around the diamond and watching them,” the Turramurra local said.

When she turned six, her mum finally signed her up and the determined youngster took to the sport like a duck to water.

“I just fell in love with the game straight away,” she shared.

“When I was out there playing, nothing else mattered. Being on that diamond, was truly my happy place.”

Tahli

It was quickly evident that softball would become more than just a hobby for Moore, who made both the Under 19’s Australian Team and the junior British National Team as a teenager.

“I made the U19’s Aussie Team in 2013, but just missed the cut for Canada Worlds which was devastating, but I found out that because my dad was British, I could also try out for the British Team.”

Moore made the junior British Team and was able to get a world cup berth under her belt, then at 17, she was awarded a college softball scholarship with James Madison University (JMU) in Virginia, US, and she set out to chase her dreams across the globe.

“I went to America having no expectations and it was a bit of a wake-up call!” she said.

“The intensity was just crazy, which was both good and bad. I love jumping in the deep end and just having to figure out a way to thrive and cope in that sort of situation.

“I went from having one or two training sessions a week, to 3-4 hours a day of softball."

Moore would return to Australia during her break, making her debut for the three-time National Championship winning side, the NSW Firestars in January 2017 and earning herself, 'Rookie of the Year,' but just two months later Moore’s softball dreams came crashing down.

The then 22-year-old suffered DVT (Deep Vein Thrombosis) in her shoulder. The resulting outcome was that she was not allowed near a softball field nor could she participate in any activity that could cause injury.

“In my senior year of college, I noticed a lot of tightness in my shoulder and my entire arm became swollen and discoloured,” Moore recalled.

“I went to a doctor in Florida who prescribed me with some aspirin and muscle relaxants, but I could tell something more serious was wrong.”

Moore was right to trust her intuition, as within days she was in surgery, having her rib removed and a wire inserted into the vein in her arm. Doctors put the cause of the blood clot down to a combination of scar tissue in her shoulder and spending extended hours travelling.

Moore faced the harsh reality that her dreams of playing elite softball, were essentially dashed.

“After surgery I had to stay on blood thinners for months, which meant I couldn’t be anywhere near the softball pitch because if I got hit by something, fell over or cut myself, my blood wouldn’t clot,” she explained.

“That was right at the beginning of my senior year of college and meant I wasn’t able to do anything.

“I was devastated because I’d worked so hard. I was the fittest I’d ever been, and I had to sit in the stands, not even the dugout because it was too dangerous,” she said.

“I would sit behind the home plate in the stands, watching my team play and wishing I could be on the field.”

Tahli Hospital

Once she was able to start training, Moore had no strength in her shoulder which quickly dwindled away any motivation she had for making a comeback and she returned to Australia.

“I gave up on my dreams of playing softball, especially at an elite level. I said to myself, ‘Ok, maybe I’ll just coach or find myself a ‘grown-up’ career’.”

It wasn’t until she was offered the chance to study her Masters abroad, that things began to look up.

“I was accepted to study my Masters in Malta, so when I had the blood clot and couldn’t play, I said to myself, ‘This is a sign, I’ll go to Malta, study and hide from the world while working on myself as a person and recovering outside of softball’.”

Not being able to stay too far away from the game, Moore began coaching a local softball team in Malta and was later joined by her friend, Tara, who would be the catalyst for Moore’s comeback.

“My friend Tara moved to Malta to help coach a softball team I was coaching. She was a UCLA alumni and she saw something in me.

“I remember her saying to me, ‘You’re going to do it, you’re going to play this year, you’re going to make the Australian Team and you’re going to go to the Olympics,’ and my first response was, ‘No way, you’re delusional!’”

“Tara persisted and got me back into the gym and encouraged me to play in Holland, which I did and that’s when things really kicked into gear,” she shared.

“I decided I was really going to go for it and started training every day to give myself the best shot of making the Australian Team.”

Her fateful move to Holland was less than 12 months ago and the resilient 24-year-old made her Aussie Spirit National Team debut at the Asian Pacific Cup in January of this year, scoring the winning run against New Zealand, 2-1.

“It sounds silly, but it just felt right. All my hard work had finally been validated and it was just so much fun,” Moore said of her long-awaited Aussie Spirit debut.

“I was so lucky to be able make my debut on my home field, where I am most comfortable. I had my family there every day of the tournament and they were so excited.”

Despite having to deal with what she describes as “a pretty gnarly curveball,” Moore says the experience taught her some valuable life lessons.

“The entire process taught me to trust my gut, because if I hadn’t, I wouldn’t be here.

“It also made me realise that life is short, so you need to pursue everything you want to. I studied, travelled and I live my life unapologetically. I just don’t worry about the small things anymore and only focus on what’s going to benefit me and those around me.

"You can be on your highest high, but you better be ready for that low. I never want to take the people around me, or the amazing position I am in for granted because it could all change in a heartbeat."

Now, Moore has her sights set on the biggest stage of them all - Tokyo 2020. There, softball will make its return to the Olympics after 11 years with the Aussie Spirit vying for a spot at the Olympic Qualifiers in China in September 2019.

“Being able to represent Australia at Tokyo 2020 would be surreal. It’s something I’ve always dreamt of. I try not to hype up too much, but I would definitely cry a little bit, especially at the announcement of teams if I were to make it,” Moore said.

“It’s going to be so exciting to watch those games and I hope we make it… We will make it!”

Liana Buratti
olympics.com.au

Athletes' Commission

Submitted by admin on Mon, 04/22/2019 - 21:28
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Australian Athletes' Commission
Article Introduction

The role of the Athletes’ Commission is to advise the AOC Executive on all matters relating to the Olympic Movement from an athlete’s perspective.

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The AOC Athletes' Commission is elected by the members of the Australian Olympic Team during the summer Games. A further two Olympians from sports on the winter program are elected by members of the Australian Olympic Winter Team during the Olympic Winter Games.

The Athletes' Commission made up of athletes elected following the Rio 2016 Olympic Games and PyeongChang 2018 Winter Olympic Games.

The Commission members are elected for a term of four years.

 

Athletes' Commission Members

CHAIR: Steve Hooker OAM (Athletics)

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Steve Hooker

 

DEPUTY: Kim Brennan AM, BA LLB (HONS) GDLP OLY (Rowing)

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Kim Brennan

 

MEMBERS

Alana Boyd OLY (Athletics)

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Alana Boyd

 

Cate Campbell OAM OLY (Swimming)

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Cate Campbell Cate Campbell.jpg

 

Jamie Dwyer (Hockey)

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Jamie Dwyer

 

Jessica Fox (Canoe/Kayak)

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Jessica Fox

 

Scott Kneller OLY (Alpine Skiing)

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Scott Kneller

 

Lydia Lassila (Freestyle Skiing)

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Lydia Lassila

 

James Tomkins (Rowing)

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James Tomkins

 

Ken Wallace (Canoe/Kayak)

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Ken Wallace

 

Shelley Watts OLY (Boxing)

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Shelley Watts