Westpac helps to bring the Olympics to Australian Communities

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/26/2020 - 14:16
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Westpac announced as Official Banking Partner of Australian Olympic Team

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In partnership with the AOC, Westpac will be bringing the Summer Games to Australians across the nation as the Presenting Partner of Olympics Live – a national program of live sites planned for major capital cities and regional areas where Australians can come together in a moment of celebration.

Each live site will be unique to the community and will offer residents a place to watch the Olympics on a big screen, meet Olympians, enjoy Japanese cultural experiences and give Olympic sports a go.

Kicking off across the country from 24th July, many live sites are planned to be hosted by regional communities. Westpac will be working with local businesses and residents in each community to help cater and run the live events.

“We’re proud to be bringing the action, excitement and adrenalin of the 2020 Olympic Games to Aussie communities through our partnership with the Australian Olympic Committee,” David Lindberg, Westpac Chief Executive Consumer said.

“Supporters will be able to visit one of our live sites in major cities and regional areas across the country to cheer on our athletes and be part of the celebrations,” Mr Lindberg said.

As part of the AOC’s ongoing commitment to rural and regional Australia, the sporting equipment used at live sites will be donated to local sporting clubs, schools or community groups to help rebuild community spirit and a commitment to sport in these regions.

Matt Carroll AM, CEO of the Australian Olympic Committee said, “We’re excited to partner with Westpac to launch Olympics Live. The live sites across the country will not only encourage all Australian to cheer on the Team but offer the opportunity to connect with Olympic sports as participants. From our major cities, to clubs and communities, we will be encouraging people to embrace the Olympic spirit and the sports themselves with an Olympic Festival.

“With Westpac’s support we’re particularly excited at the possibility of bringing the Olympic spirit to regional communities. The Olympic spirit is about resilience, giving back and creating a positive legacy and we believe these are shared values amongst Australians and will help to energise and strengthen the efforts to rebuild regional communities.”

As the Official Banking Partner of the Australian Olympic Team, Westpac is also working with the AOC to help Olympians prepare for life during and after competition. Supporting the AOC’s Opportunities Program as the Financial Literacy partner, Westpac will help to create ‘financial essentials’ education tools in collaboration with Olympians and financial experts to support athletes with everything from getting on track with money management, staying on top of debt to learning how to save for a house.

“Beyond celebrating the Games, we also want to support the athletes. Helping Olympians prepare financially for life during and after competition is a great way that we can assist these Australian sporting stars,” continued Mr Lindberg.

Mr Carroll also discussed the importance of financial literacy and the opportunity for Olympians, “The Westpac partnership also offers the AOC the opportunity to help Olympians make better financial decisions to support their future.

“The Olympian Opportunities Program, now with the support of the Westpac, will produce a financial literacy program that will help Olympians build sound financial knowledge to help them plan their financial future. Balancing work, training, family and planning your financial future is particularly challenging for athletes. This innovative new program from Westpac is really going to help meet these challenges,” Mr Carroll concluded.

Artistic Swimmers in Synch for Tokyo 2020 Selection

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:10
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The Australian Artistic Swimming team for Tokyo 2020 was announced today in Canberra, with four returning Olympians and four Olympic debutants named to the eight-strong team.

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Jane Fruzynski, Kiera Gazzard, Kirsten Kinash and Rachel Presser will make their Olympic debut in Tokyo alongside Rio Olympians Hannah Cross, Emily Rogers, Amber Rose Stackpole and Amie Thompson, with Thompson and Stackpole also named to compete in the Duet event in Tokyo.

Australia are one of just ten nations qualified to contest the Team event in Tokyo, earning their quota with a strong performance at the 2019 World Championships in Gwangju, South Korea.

Australian Chef de Mission for Tokyo 2020 Ian Chesterman said today’s selection was great recognition of the persistence and determination showed by the eight athletes.

“It is a privilege to announce the Artistic Swimming for Tokyo 2020 today,” Mr Chesterman said.

“These are all athletes from a relatively small sport who have worked so hard and sacrificed a great deal to make it to Tokyo and represent Australia at the Olympic Games.

“Their selection is not only a great personal achievement, but it will also inspire the next generation of artistic swimmers to pursue their goals towards Paris 2024, LA 2028 and hopefully Brisbane 2032.

“To those off to their second Olympics, welcome back to the Australian Olympic Team and to the four first timers, congratulations and welcome aboard.

“Making an Olympic Team is a remarkable achievement, and it has been the work of many that have made this possible, so my thanks go to families, friends, coaches, support staff and everyone at Artistic Swimming Australia who have played a vital role in reaching this milestone.

“I look forward to following the team’s progress in the upcoming months as they build towards Tokyo 2020.”

At 18 years-old, youngest member of the team Kiera Gazzard is ecstatic to make her Olympic debut.

“This is a lifelong dream of mine,” Gazzard said. “I vividly remember watching the Beijing Olympics when I was seven saying to my mum I want to go to the Olympics – I can’t believe I can now look back and say I’ve done it, I’ve made an Olympic Team.

“It’s been an amazing experience to go through the training and selection camps with a bunch of girls that I look up to and have for many years, and will now share an Olympics with them.

The Sydney based athlete has been participating in Artistic Swimming since she was eight.

“I love Artistic Swimming as it combines so many elements of art and sport. You get to express yourself creatively, but only by pushing yourself physically and executing precise technical manoeuvres. I learn something new every training session.” 

Rio Olympian and team co-captain Amie Thompson relocated from Sydney to Perth to follow her sporting dreams.

“Making this Team shows it’s about the journey and sacrifices we make, and that perseverance can end in this beautiful experience of the Olympic Games,” Thompson said.

“I had tried synchro when I was young and loved it, but there wasn’t a club near me. One day I found a flyer for a new club opening near us and it changed my life – if I hadn’t seen that flyer and given it a go I never would have been on this Olympic journey.”

The 24-year-old engineering student will contest the eight-person Teams event and the Duet with Amber Rose Stackpole.

“It feels so good to say I’m going to my second Olympics. It’s been fantastic to see the team grow and develop and be in the really strong place we’re in today, and I’m really excited to contest the Duet in Tokyo.

“While I love the performance aspect, making these incredible movements look effortless, I love the daily grind and small steps on the way. Achieving mini goals in a training session, sharing a laugh in a hard session with teammates, makes every day worth it.

“Sport has taught me when something goes wrong, I can deal with it piece by piece and overcome it - whether it’s a university assignment or something in daily life, there isn’t a challenge too big.”

Artistic Swimming Australia President Kim Davis congratulated the selected athletes on their milestone.

“Artistic Swimming Australia, in partnership with the AOC, is delighted to present the 2020 Olympic team,” Ms Davis said. “From here on forward, it is all about teamwork and perseverance for these eight athletes. 

“This is a seasoned team, four team members are Rio 2016 alumni, and ASAI is confident this experience will be met with success in Tokyo. Good luck to all the athletes in Tokyo, make Australia proud."
 

Today’s selection takes the announced Australian Team for Tokyo 2020 to 15 athletes of an expected 480-strong Team size.

Artistic Swimming made its Olympic debut in 1984 (named Synchronised Swimming) and is one of only two events that is female only at the Olympics.

Teams must perform a Technical routine of three minutes containing five technical elements that all teams must perform and a Free routine of four minutes that emphasises creativity and choreography.

10 things you didn’t know about Artistic Swimming

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/26/2020 - 12:01
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With Australia's Artistic Swimmers just announced for Tokyo 2020, what better time to get to know more about this elegant yet excitingly acrobatic watersport?

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What is Artistic Swimming?  

Artistic Swimming is a blend of acrobatics, swimming and dance, coordinated into a routine format and accompanied by music. Artistic swimmers require incredible strength, flexibility, grace, artistry and long underwater endurance.  

What is the difference between sychronised swimming and Artistic Swimming?  

There is no difference between sychronised swimming and Artistic Swimming, it is simply a name change. The name was changed by FINA in July 2017 in an attempt to rebrand the sport and boost its popularity, aligning it with similar disciplines such as gymnastics.  

When did Artistic Swimming make its Olympic debut? 

Artistic Swimming became an Olympic sport at the 1984 Los Angeles Olympic Games, featuring solo and duet events. In Atlanta 1996 the solo and duet events were replaced by an eight-person water ballet, however, since Sydney 2000 the Olympic program has included the team and duet event.

What Artistic Swimming events are on the program for Tokyo 2020? 

At Tokyo 2020, Artistic Swimming will have both a team event and a duet event. The team event is comprised of eight athletes, while, the duet is comprised of two athletes. Both events feature a technical routine, lasting a maximum 2 minutes 50 seconds, and a free routine which lasts three to four minutes. 

The technical routine requires athletes to execute a series of prescribed movements and positions, while the free routine has no required elements to perform, meaning there is a much greater emphasis on the creativity of choreography and movement. 

Alongside rhythmic gymnastics, artistic swimming is the only exclusively female Olympic sport.  

What is Australia’s best Olympic result in Artistic Swimming?  

Australia has participated in artistic swimming at every Olympic Games since its inception, except 1996. Australia’s best results have been: Team - seventh (2004); Duets - 13th by Donella Burridge/Lisa Steanes in 1984 and Lisa Lieschke/Semon Rohloff in 1988. 

How is Artistic Swimming judged?  

Routines are scored out of 100, with points awarded for execution, artistic impression and difficulty.  

Performers are scored by three panels, each comprising five judges. In the technical routine, one panel of judges scores athletes' technical execution, while another scores their choreography, use of music, synchronisation, difficulty and presentation. The third panel of judges scores the elements (five designated movements). 

In the free routine, one panel of judges scores athletes' execution, synchronisation and difficulty, while another scores their choreography, musical interpretation and presentation. The third panel scores difficulty. 

What is the size of the performance space?  

Swimmers are confined to a 12x12m competition area. The pool is just under 3 meters in depth, and swimmers are not permitted to touch the bottom throughout their performance.  

How long can the athletes hold their breath for?  

While some Artistic Swimmers can hold their breath for up to three minutes, most routines only require swimmers to hold their breath for up to one minute. Nose-clips are used to help the swimmers hold their breath while underwater, particularly while they are upside down. 

How do the athletes stay afloat in the water?  

Artistic swimmers must continuously tread water, using the eggbeater technique, throughout their performance to stay above the water. Competitors also use techniques such as sculling, in which they move their hands through the water to hold their position or move.  

How does an Artistic Swimmer's makeup and hair stay in place?  

Artistic Swimmer's layer on water-proof makeup so that the judges can clearly see their expressive faces throughout the performance. In addition, they use Knox gelatin in their hair, so it stays in place during their performance.

Kirsten Kinash

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Sport: Artistic Swimming
Event: Team
Olympic History: Olympic debut
Highlights: Making the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Team
Year Born: 1998
Place Born: Canada

 

Growing up in Canada, Kirsten Kinash always loved the water, but speed swimming up and down between the lanes became too monotonous.

When she was 7, she joined a local Artistic Swimming Club and was hooked immediately.

Her family moved to Australia three years later and Kinash joined the Gold Coast Mermaids and with "amazing coaching" and "beautiful outdoor weather" she fell further in love with the sport.

In 2017 Kinash was selected as a reserve on the team that went to the World Championships in Budapest, which she says was an amazing experience but being on the sidelines made her eager to work hard and one day earn her spot in the team.


She would achieve her goal two years later, when she was selected to swim at the 2019 World Championships in Gwanju, South Korea.

"That was the highlight of my sporting career so far," she said.

"Sitting on the phone telling my family I had finally made it and was going to swim in both team patterns at the World Championships is a moment I'll never forget."

But her greatest achievement was still ahead when the Australian team found out that their swim had qualified them for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.

The 21-year-old will join fellow teammates Rose Stackpole, Amie Thompson, Emily Rogers, Hannah Cross, Rachel Presser, Kiera Gazzard, and Jane Fruzynski as they take on Tokyo Together.

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What is a fun fact about you?

I worked a summer job performing as a mermaid in a shark tank

What do you do when you're not competing?

I am studying a Bachelor of Public Health Promotion and Public Health Nutrition

Jane Fruzynski

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Sport: Artistic Swimming
Event: Team
Olympic History: Olympic debutante
Highlights: Helping Australia qualify for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games
Year Born: 2000
State Born: WA

After attending a ‘come and try’ day for Artistic Swimming at her local pool, Jane Fruzynski knew that this was the sport for her.

Growing up in Perth, WA Fruzynski joined the West Coast Splash Synchronised Swimming Club and hasn't looked back.  

While she has been fortunate to avoid injuries in her career thus far, she has found the mental side of sport to present the biggest challenge. However, over her career she has been able to build her confidence and learn to keep an open mindset when it comes to competing.  

This growth mindset was largely influenced by her junior club coach who always showed unwavering support and belief, especially at times when Fruzynski didn’t believe in herself.  

In 2017, she was a member of the FINA World Championships team where Australia beat Egypt for the first time in six years. Not only was this a long-standing goal for the Australian team, but it was also a personal best score. 

Fruzynski was also a part of the 2019 FINA World Championships team, where Australia qualified their spot for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, an achievement she considers to be her career highlight.  

The 19-year-old will make her Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 alongside Rose Stackpole, Amie Thompson, Emily Rogers, Hannah Cross, Rachel Presser, Kiera Gazzard and Kirsten Kinash.

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Kiera Gazzard

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Sport: Artistic Swimming
Event: Team
Olympic History: Olympic debutante
Highlights: Helping Australia qualify for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games
Year Born: 2001
State Born: NSW

Kiera Gazzard first noticed Artistic Swimming at her local pool as an eight-year-old, after spotting the Artistic Swimming team training at the other end of the pool. Shortly after, Kiera attended a ‘come and try’ lesson and was recruited for the 12 & under team.  

While she grew up training at the Sydney Emerald Synchronised Swimming Club, Keira recently moved to Queensland to train at The Gold Coast Mermaids Club.

The decision to move interstate provided the perfect opportunity for Gazzard to further develop her skills and make her into the athlete she is today.  

In 2017, Gazzard was a member of the FINA World Championships team, where Australia beat Egypt for the first time in six years. This was a massive milestone for the Australia team as Egypt was Australia's biggest competition when it comes to Olympic qualification.

Growing up, Gazzard set herself a goal to become the first Australian soloist to compete at the Junior World Championships. In 2018, she made this goal a reality when she was selected to swim solo at the FINA World Junior Championships.

As well as the Solo swim, Gazzard competed in the Duet and Team events which she said was an amazing opportunity and challenge that helped her development as a senior athlete.

The 18-year-old suffered a major setback leading into the 2019 FINA World Championships when she was diagnosed with a concussion after being kicked in the head during a training session.

Considering the World Championship event was an Olympic qualifying event, the reality of being unfit to compete was difficult for Gazzard to accept.  

However, she was able to overcome this setback and rather than compete herself, Gazzard was able to watch and learn from the sidelines, where she cheered on and supported her team throughout the qualifying event.  

Gazzard will make her Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 alongside teammates Rose Stackpole, Amie Thompson, Emily Rogers, Hannah Cross, Rachel Presser, Jane Fruzynski and Kirsten Kinash as they take on Tokyo Together.

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Who has been the most influential person in your career?

I have had so many different coaches throughout my sporting carrier, all from different countries and cultures with different coaching styles and I can say that I took a unique lesson from every coach.

The most influential coach, however, is my club coach.  She played an immense role in developing my skills and making me the athlete I am today. If she hadn’t given me the opportunity to join her club ‘The Gold Coast Mermaids Synchro Club’ I am not sure where I would be today.

She took me under her wing when I moved interstate for training and made the pool my home away from home.

Rachel Presser

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Sport: Artistic Swimming
Event: Team
Olympic History: Olympic debutante
Highlights: Helping Australia qualify for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games
Year Born: 2001
State Born: NSW

Growing up on the far North Coast of NSW, Rachel Presser was an extremely active child, participating in a range of sports including dancing, gymnastics and swimming.

It wasn’t until she was nine years old that she discovered Artistic Swimming after her mother found an advertisement for the local club in the newspaper.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Due to her sporting background, Presser found she was a natural artistic swimmer as she was able to combine her water awareness, flexibility and dancing abilities and quickly fell in love with the sport.  

A key member of the Gold Coast Mermaids Synchronised Swimming Club, Presser has been swimming with the club since she started the sport in 2009.

While doing her HSC, then 17-year-old Presser competed in her first senior competition in 2017, representing Australia at the FINA World Championships in Budapest. Here, she competed as the flyer – the team member who is thrown into the air to perform specific acrobatic skills.

She said that performing tricks and flips in the water was what made her choose Artistic Swimming over her other passions, dance, gymnastics and swimming.

 
Due to a previous incident as a flyer, Presser found this experience extremely nerve-racking, however, was able to overcome her fears and perform the routine seamlessly, considering it to be her best performance to date.

Presser will make her Olympic debut at Tokyo 2020 alongside teammates Rose Stackpole, Amie Thompson, Emily Rogers, Hannah Cross, Kiera Gazzard, Jane Fruzynski and Kirsten Kinash.

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What's your most memorable sporting moment?

Watching the Highlight Routines of the top countries like Russia, Ukraine, Spain and China competing at the 2019 World Championships. They always bring new and creative lift ideas and they’re all just so strong and inspirational. I really love the Floor Routines of US Gymnasts Simone Biles and Katelyn Ohashi. I’m also a big fan of the Women’s Relay 4x100m Freestyle with Cate and Bronte Campbell (big fan), as well as watching Katie Ledecky and Sarah Sjostrom absolutely smash their competition.

Who has been the most inspirational person of your career?

The most influential person to me has been my club coach. She has such an all-round and in-depth knowledge of the sport. She knows exactly what it takes to have the mindset of an elite athlete; the motivation, strength, persistence, determination, and philosophy of working hard to achieve your goals. My other source of inspiration are my teammates. These people, as well as the countless other athletes of Artistic Swimming who continue to push boundaries and showcase amazing skill, technique and talent, are my inspiration and influence

Olympics Unleashed: Tokyo - Jenna O'Hea

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/26/2020 - 10:52
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After suffering from a recent wrist fracture and forced to miss out on the Tokyo qualifying series, Australian Opals Captain Jenna O’Hea talks to David Culbert about her excitement to be back in the green and gold and an emotional initiative that is close to her heart.

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In this episode of Olympics Unleashed - Tokyo, presented by Optus, O’Hea shares the highs and lows of competitive basketball, from London 2012 Olympic Bronze to missing out on the Rio 2016 Team. 

She reflects on her work with the AIS Lifeline community custodians program, a cause close to her heart and also discusses what the next few months leading into Tokyo 2020 will look like for the Opals team.

You can listen to more Olympics Unleashed: Tokyo Podcasts HERE

Coronavirus update - key points from the AOC

Submitted by admin on Wed, 02/26/2020 - 07:48
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The AOC would like to share the following updates in relation to Coronavirus and the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games;

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  • Australian health authorities have not implemented any travel restrictions in relation to Japan.
  • The Australian Government does however recommend that travellers exercise a high degree of caution in Japan, due to a heightened risk of local transmission
  • We remain vigilant and concerned - but it is important that people remain calm and act on the best health advice available. 
  • We are continuing to plan on the assumption that the Tokyo Games are proceeding as planned.
  • We are taking expert advice from the Commonwealth Department of Health, the World Health Organisation (WHO), Japan Ministry of Health and Tokyo Games Organising Committee (TOCOG).  
  • Dr David Hughes, AOC Medical Director for the Tokyo Games and Chief Medical Officer for the AIS also continues to provide regular advice.
  • John Coates, as Chair of the IOC Coordination Commission for the Tokyo Games is well placed to keep us informed.

WEEKEND WRAP: Selection trials, World Cup podiums and Beach Volleyball gold

Submitted by admin on Mon, 02/24/2020 - 14:03
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Young guns and Olympians impressed at Canoe Slalom and Shooting selection trials, Aussie gymnasts won World Cup medals, Beach Volleyball gold for Schumann and McHugh, and Starc and Hall impressed at the Sydney Track Classic this weekend in Olympic sport.

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Paddle: Australia’s paddlers claim triple gold and bronze at Australian Open Canoe Slalom

Rio Olympian Lucien Delfour and dual Olympic medallist Jessica Fox wrapped up the 2020 Australian Open Canoe Slalom in style, taking out gold in the Men’s K1 and Women’s C1 respectively.

It was the second gold medal for Fox, who earlier claimed the top spot in the Women’s K1 event.


Tasmanian Daniel Watkins also featured on the podium, winning bronze in the Men’s C1 event.

The event also doubled as the final Olympic selection event for Australia’s Canoe Slalom Men, with both Delfour’s and Watkin’s performances provisionally qualifying them a spot at Tokyo 2020.

Find out more HERE

Winter Sport: Back-to-back podiums for Peel and Anthony


Australia's winter athletes have continued to dominate the podiums, with aerial skier Laura Peel claiming gold and mogul skier Jakara Anthony adding bronze to her collection.

Improving upon her silver finish in Moscow last week, aerial skier Laura Peel has claimed gold in Belarus, her third podium appearance for the season. 

Over in Japan, the silverware kept coming for the Aussies, with Jakara Anthony claiming moguls bronze, her second consecutive podium for the season.

Read more HERE

 

Beach Volleyball: McHugh and Schumann win Gold in Asia again

Chris McHugh and Damien Schumann have taken out the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Tour event in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, defeating Austria’s Christopher Dressler and Alexander Huber in the gold medal game 21-16, 30-28.

The duo topped the podium for the second time in two weeks in their first two tournaments since being reunited as a playing pair, after taking out the Asian Championship in Thailand last weekend.


Find out more HERE

Shooting: Repacholi chases fifth Olympic Games after selection trials gold

Daniel Repacholi has staked an early claim for selection to Tokyo 2020 after winning the first men’s 10m Air Pistol final in the Tokyo Olympic Games pistol nomination event.

The four-time Olympian from Cessnock, NSW showed his class when scoring 240.1 points ahead of West Australians Bailey Groves (234.5) and Mike Giustiniano (211.9) at the Brisbane International Shooting Centre over the weekend.

In the women’s 25m Pistol final, Victoria’s Elena Galiabovitch (28 targets) claimed her second gold medal of the weekend when scoring a comfortable victory ahead of South Australia’s Alison Heinrich (21) and Queensland’s Civon Smith (16).

Read all about it HERE
 

 

Gymnastics: Aussies wrap up Melbourne Worlds with silver and bronze

Georgia Godwin and Mitchell Morgans claimed silver and bronze in the Uneven and Horizontal Bars respectively, after a solid weekend of competition at the Melbourne Gymnastics World Cup.

Godwin, who has provisionally qualified for Tokyo 2020 was the first Aussie to claim a medal, when she went head to head with Australian teammate, Georgia-Rose Brown in the finals of Uneven Bars.

Mitchell Morgans added a second medal for Australia, when he secured bronze on the High Bar.

You can find more results HERE

Hockey: Kookaburras sneak above India in FIH standings

Four sublimely worked goals gave the Kookaburras a narrow 4-3 win over India in a frenzied FIH Pro League match at the Kalinga Stadium in Bhubaneshwar on Saturday night.

Up 2-0 at half time courtesy of Dylan Wotherspoon and Tom Wickham, two third-quarter goals in quick succession from Lachlan Sharp and Jacob Anderson proved enough to maintain the Kookaburras’ impressive record in the subcontinent and hold off an Indian side that stormed home in the final 15 minutes.

However, the Aussies couldn’t replicate the performance 24-hours later, going down to India 3-1 in a penalty shootout on Sunday, after the scores were locked at 2-all at full time.

The result was still enough for the Kookaburras to jump above India into third place on the FIH Pro League standings, before they return home to Perth to face Argentina on 6/7 March.

 

Find out more HERE

Athletics: Aussies return to top form at Sydney Track Classic

High Jumper Brandon Starc equalled his best jump in 18 months, clearing 2.30 meters to take the gold at the Sydney Track Classic at Sydney Olympic Park on the weekend.

Hammer thrower Alex Hulley threw a 1.89cm PB of 70.55m – the longest distance thrown by an Australian female hammer thrower in 14 years.
 


The 22-year-old is the third Australian to throw over 70m and is 57cm short of the Australian Record. Linden Hall won the Women’s 1500m in 4:05.16, while Jenny Blundell recorded her best time in four years - 4:05.35 – to finish second.

800m runners Peter Bol and Joseph Deng returned to their 2018-best form, with Bol taking the win in 1:45.85 with Deng just behind him in second with 1:45.89.

Both runners are chasing down the 1:45.20 Tokyo 2020 Olympic qualifying time.


See all the results from the Sydney Track Classic HERE

Sailing: Stransky in top ten after first day of Worlds

Mara Stansky finished the first day of the Laser Radial Worlds in ninth, overcoming difficult conditions in Melbourne.


Stransky battled through the shifty, light winds to record a keeper score, with racing continuing today in Melbourne.

Find out more HERE