Bernadette Wallace

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 11:39
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Website Bio Headshots Canoe SprintBernadette Wallace
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Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint
Event: Canoe
Olympic History: Olympic debutante  
Highlights: Two world cup gold  medals on the same day in 2013, 2019 National Champion C1 and C2 500
Coach: Cristi Florian
Year Born: 1989
State Born: New South Wales   

 

About Bernadette

Bernadette Wallace is following in her brother’s footsteps, but her Olympic journey is unique and historic. 

12 years ago, Bernadette’s brother Ken made history when he became Australia’s most successful male Olympian in Beijing, winning two gold medals in the K1 500 and 1000 events. 

In 2020, Bernadette will become one of only two Australian women to compete in an Olympic canoe event, as the discipline debuts on the women’s program at Tokyo. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

My Jet Pack Josie 🚀@josephinebulmer.raywhite 🚀 I remember watching Josie race basically alone at the 2016 GP2 in Adelaide. I was standing in the car park about to go home with my neck taped up, and looked out to the course and saw her racing down her lane. I remember thinking, wow this girl has guts. To take a chance on swapping boats after being Junior National Champion in the kayak multiple times. I had a fair amount of respect for that, for challenging herself. I didn’t imagine we would be partners one day but I’m so glad we are. Thank you for your patience, for your time, and your resilience 💪 you’re so freakin funny and have kept it light for me when the game has been heavy. We are only getting better and thank you for leading the way here in Australia for people like me to join in the fun. Thank you to Cristi Florian our Coach who dreams the same dream and works just as hard for it. Thank you to Craig the wizard scientist S&C at SASI that got my noodle limbs ready for the challenge 💪Australian National Champions 2020 yewww 🚀🤙 Pic @jgrimages @auspaddleteam @paddle_australia @sa_sports_institute #JetpackJosie #JosieOG #danidevito #arnie #twins #icfsprint #tokyotogether

A post shared by Bernadette Wallace (@bernadettewallace) on

 

Ken’s influence sparked Bernadette’s interest in kayaking as she envied his overseas adventures. She would drive her brother to the airport and wanted the same experience for herself. 

 

Despite a full roster of sports including swimming, surf lifesaving and figure skating, Bernadette found time to get along to a nearby creek and try kayaking.   

The friendships she formed kept her going in the early days, but the results were also a driving force. In 2013, Bernadette won world cup medals in the K1 5000 and K2 1000 with Olympian Naomi Flood. 

Wallace’s bid to make the Rio Olympics in 2016 was cut short due to a cancer scare. Weeks before the selection trials she was diagnosed with melanoma following the removal of a lump on her neck. 

With a new outlook, Wallace accepted a coaching position in Canada. She began canoeing to keep up with her young squad. 

At the age of 27, Wallace achieved her biggest personal and sporting achievement when she returned to the sport in a different class of boat, while coaching in Canada.

Wallace started to prepare for an Olympics tilt. She returned from Canada and relocated to South Australia to base with paddle partner Josephine Bulmer. 

In 2020, Wallace and Bulmer secured Australia’s first-ever women’s Olympic canoe quota spots when they won the C2 500 at the Oceania Canoe Sprint Championships. Their Olympic debut was confirmed and history written when they won the C2 500 and Wallace won the C1 200 at the Australian Championships.   

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When did you start competing in your sport and why?

I started kayaking when I was 13 for fun after seeing my brother becoming Junior World Champion. I started canoeing when I was 27 when I moved to Canada to be an under 15 coach at Rideau, the young women were so strong and skilful in my squad that I wanted to be able to paddle alongside them. I stayed consistent with my training and I have been able to represent Australia again doing what I love.

What is a fun fact about you?

I've always been very creative and artistic and have had my artwork featured on some of my brother's boats. You can follow my art at #CreativeRave

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Trust yourself. Keep learning. Follow your curiosity. You are stronger than you can ever imagine.

Who was your most influential coach?

John Newton. He was my junior coach and taught me to love what I do, to challenge the boys at training, and to have confidence in myself. He taught me that doubting yourself is a waste of time and girls can do anything.

Results Table
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Joanne Brigden-Jones

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 11:30
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
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Silver Medals
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Gold Medals
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Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts 

Sport: Canoe – Sprint
Event: Kayak 
Olympic History: London 2012 
Highlights: Racing at the London 2012 Olympic Games
Coach: Jake Michael 
Year Born: 1988
State Born: New South Wales  

 

About Jo

Growing up in Mona Vale on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, Jo Brigden-Jones divided her free time between athletics, netball, nippers and swimming. She enjoyed sport because it allowed her to be with her friends and have fun outdoors. 

Brigden-Jones began taking a serious interest in sport when the Northern Beaches Kayak Club selected the 13-year-old for their talent identification program. She began paddling four times a week and would challenge herself to get better each day. 

 

Brigden-Jones made steady progress with the paddle, but it took two years of serious training and persistence before she found her rhythm. During this time, she represented Australia at the Junior World Championships and Australian Youth Olympic Festival where she won five medals. 

2008 was a breakthrough year as Brigden-Jones graduated to senior competition. Her form steadily improved and in 2010 she won her first individual world cup medal. Brigden-Jones was the top ranked female paddler and was looking strong ahead of the World Championships before a shoulder injury forced her withdrawal from the competition. 

An injury-free Brigden-Jones returned to competition in 2011 and won her first world championships medal, a bronze in the K2 200 metres (with Hannah Davis). The pair also paddled in the K4 500m and secured Australia quota positions for the London 2012 Olympic Games. Brigden-Jones was subsequently selected to her first Australian Olympic Team. 

At London, Brigden-Jones joined forces with Hannah Davis, Lyndsie Fogarty and Rachel Lovell in the K4 500. The crew finished sixth in their heat and semi-final.

Like many of her competitors, Brigden-Jones complements flat water training with surf lifesaving. At the 2013 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships she experienced another injury set-back when she dislocated her shoulder for a second time. 

Brigden-Jones missed selection to the Olympic Games in Rio and took a break from the sport in 2016. During this time she fulfilled a lifelong dream of becoming a paramedic with NSW Ambulance. 

 

Drawn back to paddling in 2017, Brigden-Jones could not ignore the desire to represent Australia at another Olympics and she resumed racing with a view to competing at Tokyo 2020. 

In 2018, Brigden-Jones celebrated 15 years on the Australian Canoe Sprint Team and finished second at Szeged (HUN) World Cup K4 500. 

Eight years after she made her Olympic debut, Brigden-Jones secured selection to her second Australian Olympic Team after she finished second behind Alyce Wood in the K1 500 at the 2020 Australian Championships. It was a successful regatta for Brigden-Jones who also won the women’s K1 and K2 200 and finished second in the women’s K2 500.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Eyes on the prize 👀 Oceania Championships and first round of Aus Olympic Trials kick off tomorrow.

A post shared by Jo Brigden-Jones (@jobrigdenjones) on

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What do you like the best about competing?

I love the chance to challenge myself. I also love the range of emotions you go through on race day, nothing much can replicate those feelings!

Who was your most influential coach and why?

My first kayak coach, Christine Duff. She taught me to dream big, how to work hard and how to overcome setbacks.

What is your favourite/most memorable sporting moment?

Watching Cathy Freeman race at the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

If you were stuck on a desert island and could only have three items what would they be?

An oven, brownie mix and a chicken to lay the eggs needed for the brownies.

What is your hidden talent?

I am a cake baker, I make wedding cakes, special occasion and fun themed cakes.

Results Table
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Thomas Green

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 11:14
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WebHeaders_Canoe_Sprint_1600x698 Website Hero Image Tom Green
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
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Gold Medals
0
Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts 

Sport: Canoe – Sprint
Event: Kayak
Olympic History: Olympic Debutante
Highlights: Backing up my 2019 National 500m and 1000m K1 titles this year and being selected on my first Australian Olympic Team.
Year Born: 1999
State Born: Queensland    

About Thomas

A young Thomas Green always loved the water and sport. He started kayaking at the age of 10 at the Currumbin Creek Canoe Club when he saw his older brother and sister having fun as they learnt to paddle.   

“I’m not sure if it was my fear of falling in and getting bitten by a shark, or my fierce competitiveness with my brother and sister that saw me take off and never look back,” Green says. 

With a family background in surf lifesaving, Green was never far from the water. Together with his brother Lachy and sister Britt, Green competed at the 2012 Outrigging World Championships in 2012.    

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Just want to get back in this amazing ski

A post shared by Tom Green (@tom.green99) on


Green was enjoying “having a bit of a play in the kayak around surf lifesaving racing and training” but was encouraged by kayaking stalwart John Newtown to take flatwater paddling seriously. 

Within weeks, Green was competing at the Australian Canoe Sprint Championships and won 11 medals in his division, including three gold. 

Five months after that first flatwater paddle, Green was selected to represent Australia at the 2015 Olympic Hopes Regatta in Poland. He won a silver medal in the K1 500 metres and a bronze medal in the K1 1000m.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

There Was some good memories in 2015👌🏼

A post shared by Tom Green (@tom.green99) on

Returning to open water competition in 2017, Green completed a stunning comeback at the Australian Surf Life Saving Championships. He had established a tidy lead in the under 18 surf ski final but made a wrong turn and found himself 150 metres behind the pack. A determined Green changed course and won the race in a photo finish. “I paddled like I’ve never paddled before,” Green said. 

With the 2020 Olympics coming into focus, Green partnered with Joel McKitterick and won gold in the K2 1000 at the 2018 Under 23 World Championships. It was a breakthrough year as Green made the leap to elite competition and represented Australia at a senior World Championships for the first time where he finished fourth in the K4 500 and eighth in the K1 500.  


In 2019, Green became a dual U23 world champion when he won gold at the Under 23 World Championships in the K1 1000m and K4 500 (with team mates Jackson Collins, Riley Fitzsimmons and Jean van der Westuyzen). 

He went on to finish fourth in the K1 500 at the World Championships.

Green was the stand-out paddler at the first of two Olympic selection events, taking home the win in the K1 1000, K1 500, K2 1000 and U23 K2 1000.

He was just as dominant at the 2020 Australian Canoe Sprint Championships realising his Olympic dream after winning gold in K1 1000. In a field boasting Olympic champions Murray Stewart and Green’s mentor Ken Wallace, the young paddler showed class to win in a time of 3min 36.15sec which was 1.10sec in front of Jean van der Westhuysen and Rio 2016 Olympian Jordan Wood. 

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Who is your greatest influence?

There have been so many people in my life that have contributed to my success and the person I have become. I simply can’t single this down to one person.

What has been your greatest challenge?

Growing up in a single parent family was tough and provided adversity in so many aspects of life.  Finances were always so tight and there were many very hard decisions that had to be made. I think Mum was the person who had to make the most sacrifices and overcome the most adversity to give us kids the opportunities in sport and life that we have had. The positive side of this is the lessons and the tenacity it has taught us.  We are strong and resilient because of these experiences.

What is your favourite/most memorable sporting moment?

Watching Alistair Brownlee carry his brother Jonny across the finish line of the 2016 World Championships after he went down with heat exhaustion 500 metres before the finish.

 

 

Results Table
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Ten things you didn't know about Canoe Sprint

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 10:43
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Alyce Burnett and Aly Bull celebrate qualifying for the Final A after competing in the Canoe Sprint Women's Kayak Double 500m Semifinal 1 on Day 10 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games (Photo by Mark Kolbe/Getty Images)
Article Introduction

What's the difference between a canoe and a kayak, who is Australia's most successful Canoe Sprint Paddler? Get to know Australia's most recently selected Tokyo Olympic sport.

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Ten things you didn't know about Canoe Sprint

1. What is Canoe Sprint?

In Canoe Sprint, competitors in canoes or kayaks race to the finish on a flat-water course. The Olympics include races over distances of 200, 500, and 1000 metres and encompasses both individual and team events. The sport requires great power, technique and synchronisation to be successful.

2. What is the difference between a kayak and a canoe?

A kayak is a closed boat whereas a canoe is an open boat. When racing a kayak, competitors paddle from a sitting position with a double-blade paddle. On the other hand, canoes are paddled from a kneeling position with a single-blade paddle. Additionally, kayak paddlers steer with their feet using a rudder, whereas canoes steer using their paddles.

 


3. When did Canoe Sprint make its Olympic debut?

Canoe sprint made its Olympic debut at the 1936 Games in Berlin. However, women’s kayak events did not appear until London 1948 and the C1 and C2 women's events will make their Olympic debut at Tokyo.

Australia has competed in every Canoe Sprint competition since the 1956 Games in Melbourne.

4. What was Australia’s best Olympic result?

At Beijing 2008, the Australian Canoe Sprint Team came home with one gold and two bronze medals in the Men’s K1 500, K1 1000 and Women’s K4 500 respectively, making it the Team’s most successful Games.

5. What do the letters and numbers mean?

The K or C represents whether the craft used in the race is a kayak or a canoe. The numbers that follow (1,2 or 4) represent how many paddlers are in each boat. For example, the K2 would involve a kayak with two paddlers in each boat.

6. How is canoe sprint different from Canoe Slalom?

Canoe Slalom takes place on white-water rapids courses whereas Canoe Sprint is staged on calm waters. Canoe Slalom also includes gates throughout the course which competitors must pass through.

While the objective of both sports is to finish the fastest, Canoe Slalom is based on a time with penalties for touching or missing gates along the course, whereas the winner in Canoe Sprint is always the first boat to cross the finish line.

7. Who is Australia’s most successful Canoe Sprinter?

Clint Robinson won Australia’s first Olympic gold medal in Canoe Sprint at Barcelona 1992 when he won the K1 1000 final. He later won a bronze medal at Atlanta 1996 for the same event and at Athens 2004 he teamed up with Nathan Baggaley to win a silver medal in the K2 500.

 

 

8. What events will be held in Tokyo?

There will be 12 Canoe Sprint events at the Tokyo Olympics. With the addition of the women’s C1 200 and C2 500, for the first time, there will be an equal number of women’s and men’s canoe sprint races.

This marks the first time that women’s canoe events will be included on the Olympic program.

9. How is the event organized?

Each event is separated into heats. Then the best competitors from the initial heats earn a spot in the semi-final. Those with the best times in the previous rounds receive better lane positions. The top eight teams from the semi-final round compete in a final sprint.

10. How fast can sprint kayaks go?

Men’s K1 200 races finish in about 30 seconds and can reach speeds of about 24 km/hr

Murray Stewart

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 09:58
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WebHeaders_Canoe_Sprint_1600x698 Website Hero Image Murray Stewart
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
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Gold Medals
1
Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint  
Olympic History: London 2012 (gold); Rio 2016 (bronze)  
Highlights: Winning Olympic Gold in the K4 1000 at the London 2012 Olympic Games  
Coach: Jake Michael   
Year Born: 1986 
Country Born: South Africa  

About Murray

Murray Stewart immigrated to Australia with his family in early 2000. Growing up in South Africa, he excelled in athletics, swimming and water polo but switched to the surf ski once settled in Australia. His father had been a champion sprint, slalom and surf paddler so the transition was a natural fit.  

Stewart was a talented junior and bagged national medals all while completing his high school exams.  

He started flat water kayaking in 2005 and a year later was selected to an Australian under 23 team and won the K1 1000 metres at an event in Poland.  

A young Murray had one eye on the Beijing 2008 Olympics, but a ruptured appendix followed by a spinal fracture in late 2007 disrupted his preparations and he was forced to put his Olympic dream on hold for four more years.  

Murray won the single ski events at the 2008 Lifesaving World Championships and 2009 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships and began to build to the London 2012 Olympic Games.

At the start of 2012, Stewart stormed into the public eye with a huge run of top performances at the Olympic selection events. He came first in the K1, K2 and K4 1000m events at the Oceania Championships, before backing up at the Australian Championships to win the same three events.


Lining up for three events at the London 2012 Games, undoubtedly Stewart’s highlight of his debut Olympic campaign was taking out gold in the K4 1000 alongside teammates Jacob Clear, David Smith and Tate Smith. In what was a closely fought tussle, the Australians held a 0.09 second lead at the halfway mark of the race before going on to claim victory by 0.61 seconds ahead of Hungary at the Eton Dorney course. 

Stewart finished 8th in the B Final of the K1 1000 and 6th in his heat of the K1 200 – missing the semi-finals. 

Four years later at Rio 2016, Stewart lined up at his second Olympics. Despite an injury-plagued preparation, he was in the mix for a medal in the K1 1000.

In the final he paced himself out of the start with Portugal’s Fernando Pimenta taking the early lead and Stewart in fourth. As the paddlers approached the halfway mark, Stewart made his move and upped his pace to move into second place with London 2012 bronze medallist Josef Dostal of the Czech Republic behind him.

Stewart couldn't hold on as Spain's Marcus Walz stormed to gold and Dostal and Anoshkin claimed the silver and bronze medals, with Stewart just over three-tenths of a second outside the medal places.  

Stewart’s third Olympic campaign, Tokyo 2020 was buoyed by Olympic bronze medallist Lachlan Tame when the pair teamed up to win K2 1000 silver at the first round of selections at the Grand Prix 2 and bronze at the 2020 Australian Canoe Sprint Championships and second Olympic selection event.

The duo finished behind Rio Olympians Riley Fitzsimmons and Jordan Wood and the second-placed pairing Tom Green and Jean van der Westhuyzen. 

Off the water, Stewart followed in his architect mother’s footsteps and completed a Masters of Architecture.   

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Results Table
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Alyce Wood

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 09:58
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
0
Silver Medals
0
Gold Medals
0
Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint
Event: Kayak
Olympic History: Rio 2016
Highlights: Becoming K1 1000 World Champion in 2017; finishing eighth in the K2 500 at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games
Coach: Anna Wood
Year Born: 1992
State Born: Queensland 

 

About Alyce

Whether it’s a hair tie or nail polish, Alyce Wood (née Burnett) wears a hint of pink to every race. It might be her lucky colour but with the paddler’s selection to a second Australian Olympic Team, Wood also has green and gold on her side.   

Growing up on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, a seven-year-old Wood aspired to be an Ironwoman. She turned to kayaking at the age of 15 to improve her surf ski paddling and fell in love with the sport. 

 

A member of the Maroochydore SLSC, Wood was inspired by the club’s "strong pedigree of ski paddlers and kayakers". A multiple Australian surf lifesaving medallist, Wood continues to compete on the sand and in the surf, but it’s on flat water where the world champion paddler has made her mark.

Wood’s first international success came in 2015 when she and paddle partner Aly Bull combined to win the K2 500 metres at the Under 23 World Championships. 

Wood made her Olympic debut in Rio alongside Bull. The young pair won both K2 selection events, defeating their Olympian idol Naomi Flood and her partner Olympian Jo Brigden-Jones in an upset to secure their spot. 

At the Rio Games, the duo made the A-Finals of the K2 500m by finishing third in their semi-final. In the final they came eighth and finished in a time of 1min 51.915sec. 

 

Wood won her maiden World Championships title in 2017 in the K1 1000. Between 2018-2019 she nabbed a host of world cup medals including K1 5000 gold at the 2019 Duisburg (GER) World Cup, K4 500 silver at the 2018 Szeged (HUN) World Cup, K1 5000 bronze at the 2018 Duisburg World Cup as well as K1 5000 gold at the 2019 Duisburg World Cup.

At the 2019 World Championships, Wood was part of the K4 500 team with Bull, Robert and Bridget-Jones who secured Australia four quota spots with a seventh place.

Four years after they achieved an upset, Wood and Bull were the favourites leading into Australia’s Tokyo 2020 selection trials. The pair dominated both nomination events winning the K2 500 Australian and Oceania Championships. Proving her strength in the individual event, Wood also claimed K1 500 gold at both events. 

Wood is married to fellow kayaker and Olympian Jordan Wood. Paddling is a family affair for Alyce who is coached by her mother-in-law, Olympic medallist Anna Wood. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

In my favourite colours with my favourite guy. Love this country! Happy Australia Day! 💚💛

A post shared by Alyce Wood (Burnett) (@alycewood_) on

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What was your first junior club?

Sunshine Coast Paddle Sport Club, which I am still a member of today.  

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Don't just go through the motions with things. If you are truly passionate about something make sure you ask questions and go the extra mile.

What is your favourite/most memorable sporting moment?

Watching the London Olympics at home with my family when the men’s K4 1000 won gold. I think my whole neighbourhood heard me screaming.

What do you like best about competing?

I love being taken outside of my comfort zone and see what I can do. 

What do you do when you aren’t kayaking?

I am a digital media strategist and consultant to small businesses which keeps me busy. Outside of that we always have a small renovation on the go at home or keeping my dog, Homer, entertained.

If you were stuck on a desert island and could only have three items what would they be?

My husband Jordan (he's very handy and resourceful), my dog Homer (he's very entertaining) and a lifetime supply of chocolate (because who wouldn't want to eat chocolate when stuck on an island).

What is your hidden talent?

Can burn toast

Results Table
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Jordan Wood

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 09:58
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
0
Silver Medals
0
Gold Medals
0
Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint  
Olympic History: Rio 2016  
Highlights: Winning the K4 1000 at the 2017 World Championships  
Coach: Jimmy Owens    
Year Born: 1994 
State Born: Queensland   

About Jordan

Jordan Wood started paddling at a very young age, growing up om the Gold Coast by the water with Olympic kayakers for parents.

His late father Steve Wood won K4 1000 metres bronze at Barcelona 1992, while his mother Anna previously competed for The Netherlands, won K2 500m bronze for Australia at Atlanta 1996 and placed sixth at Sydney 2000. Anna is now the coach of the Australian women’s canoe sprint team.

A young Jordan never felt the pressure to pick up a paddle and spent his junior years racing mountain bike, he only started kayaking seriously at 15, when his downhill mountain biking injuries took a toll.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Fixiee

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Wood had his first taste of Olympic glory at the 2013 Australian Youth Olympic Festival where he won gold in the K2 1000 and silver in the K1 1000 and K2 200, then in 2015, he partnered with Riley Fitzsimmons and won K2 1000 gold at the Under 23 World Championships.  

The pair put themselves on the Rio radar when they won the first Grand Prix regatta of the 2016 season, defeating 2015 World Championships silver medallists and Olympians Ken Wallace and Lachlan Tame.  

Wood made his Olympic debut at Rio 2016 where he teamed with Jacob Clear, Fitzsimmons and Wallace in the K4 1000. The crew went down fighting in the final to finish fourth behind Germany, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.


2017 was a defining year for Wood as he experienced success in the junior and elite categories, overcoming the diagnosis of an autoimmune disease in the process.

At the 2017 World Championships, he won K4 1000 gold with Fitzsimmons, Stewart and Wallace.  In the same year, Wood and Fitzsimmons also won K2 1000 bronze at the Under 23 World Championships.

The pair’s shared K2 medal haul included a bronze and two silver world cup medals won across 1000 and 500 metres distances. 

At the 2019 Canoe Sprint World Championships, they also finished fifth in the K2 1000, securing Australia a Tokyo 2020 quota spot in the process.

Fitzsimmons and Wood won their selection to Tokyo when they claimed K2 1000 gold at the 2020 Australian Championships in a time of 3 min 12.04sec, with the duo overcoming newcomers Tom Green and Jean van der Westhuyzen who finished second by a 1.05sec margin.  

Wood is married to fellow kayaker and Olympian Alyce Wood (nee Burnett).

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Jordan Wood Latest News
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What was your first junior club?

Gold Coast Canoe Club

Who was your most influential coach?

Dennis Green. He introduced me to Kayaking and is a legend of the sport. He had so many great stories and so much passion for our sport.

What inspires you?

I've always been inspired by the people around me. My mum, my old coaches Vince and Anders and my teammates have all inspired me at any given time.

Results Table
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Lachlan Tame

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 09:58
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WebHeaders_Canoe_Sprint_1600x698 Website Hero Image Lachlan Tame.
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
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Silver Medals
0
Gold Medals
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Athlete Introduction
Fast Facts
 
Sport: Canoe – Sprint  
Olympic History: Rio 2016 (bronze)
Coach: Jimmy Owens  
Year Born: 1988
State Born: New South Wales  

About Lachlan

Lachlan ‘Lachie’ Tame joined the Avoca Beach SLSC as a five-year-old. He started ski paddling at the age of 18 and in 2010 made a bet with a friend that he could make the Olympic Games. It was a bet he won six years later.

Tame first achieved prominence when he won the single ski event at the 2011 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships, but his Canoe Sprint breakthrough came in 2014 when he partnered with Beijing 2008 gold medallist Ken Wallace to win World Championships silver in the K2 1000 metres.  

Honing his craft on open water, Tame is a multiple Australian Surf Life Saving Champion. The dominant ski paddler was inducted into the Surf Life Saving Australia Hall of Fame in 2015.    

That same year he and Wallace won gold in the K2 500m (non-Olympic) and silver in the K2 1000 at the World Championships, which took their 2015 World Series medal tally to seven.  

Tame made his Olympic debut at the Rio 2016 Games, where he teamed up with triple Olympian Ken Wallace in the K2 1000 to take home bronze. 
 

 

The pair powered out of the start to sit behind leaders Germany at the halfway mark of the race. With Germany continuing to extend their lead, it was a battle for silver and bronze, with the Serbians holding off Australia, leaving Wallace and Tame to snap up bronze ahead of Portugal. 

Following a break and surgery post-Rio, Tame returned for his second Olympic campaign in 2019 and led the men's k4 500 to a fourth place and quota spot at the World Championships.

In 2020, he teamed up with Olympic gold medallist Murray Stewart to win K2 1000 bronze at the 2020 Australian Canoe Sprint Championships and second Olympic selection event.

The duo finished behind Rio Olympians Riley Fitzsimmons and Jordan Wood and the second-placed pairing of Tom Green and Jean van der Westhuyzen. 

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What is an interesting fact about you?

As a superstition, I have to mow my lawns before leaving home for a competition.

What do you do when you're not training or competing?

When I have time away from the water, I am a self-employed builder.  

Results Table
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Aly Bull

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 09:58
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WebHeaders_Canoe_Sprint_1600x698 Website Hero Image Alyssa Bull
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Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
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Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint
Event: Kayak
Olympic History: Rio 2016
Highlights: Becoming Under 23 K1 1000 World Champion in 2017; finishing eighth in the K2 500 at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games
Coach: Anna Wood
Year Born: 1995
State Born: Queensland 

 

About Aly 

Unable to go to the Olympic Games in her chosen sport of surf lifesaving, Alyssa ‘Aly’ Bull started kayaking to fulfil an Olympic dream. Bull was inspired to try kayaking when she watched her surf lifesaving idol Naomi Flood compete at London 2012.  

Bull started ski paddling at the age of 16 for surf lifesaving and was the Under 17 Australian Ironwoman Champion in 2012. 

 

In 2013, she competed at her first national kayaking competition before she represented Australia at the Junior World Championships and finished eighth in the K4 500 metres.  

During this time, Bull was climbing surf lifesaving ranks and she competed in the 2012/13 and 2013/14 Ironwoman series. 

A decision to focus on kayaking full-time paid dividends as Bull achieved her childhood dream when she made her Olympic debut in Rio alongside K2 partner Alyce Wood. The pair won both K2 selection events, defeating their idol Naomi Flood and her partner Olympian Jo Brigden-Jones, in an upset to secure their spot. 

At the Rio Games, the duo made the A-Finals of the K2 500m by finishing third in their semi-final. In the final they came eighth and finished in a time of 1min 51.915sec. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Throwing shakas to one of the best days of my life #ABsq #flashback #olympics #engine #oakley #bsc @ausolympicteam

A post shared by Aly Bull (@alybull) on

 

Although firmly focused on kayaking, Bull often returns to surf lifesaving competition and in 2018 she won the world surf ski title at the Lifesaving World Championships. At the 2019 Australian Surf Life Saving Championships, Bull dominated the ski events winning four gold medals for the Alexandra Headland SLSC.  

 

Four years after they achieved an upset, Bull and Wood were the favourites leading into Australia’s Tokyo 2020 selection trials. The pair dominated both nomination events winning the K2 500 Australian and Oceania Championships. Individually, Bull finished the Australian Championships with K1 500 bronze. 

Bull is also a firefighter with Queensland Fire and Emergency Services. After failing to make the Academy in her first attempt, Bull finished Dux of her course in 2018. 

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What inspired you to pursue kayaking?

Initially, like every athlete, my dream was to represent my country on the greatest world stage, which is the Olympics. Growing up my chosen sport, surf lifesaving, couldn’t take me there. I started kayaking and quickly fell in love with it and the people that are involved.

Who was your most influential coach and why?

Janelle Pallister, she encouraged me to put surf lifesaving on hold to chase Olympic dreams.

What do you like the best about competing?

I love the adrenaline that comes with racing. The nerves mixed with a ton of excitement is impossible to replicate in any other environment. And when you race team boats, your best buddies are right there with you.

Who is your biggest inspiration?

My brother was my biggest inspiration growing up. Being two years older than me, I always wanted to be doing what he did. Whether that was kicking the footy in the back yard or constantly trying to chase him at training.

Results Table
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Riley Fitzsimmons

Submitted by admin on Fri, 03/27/2020 - 08:22
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WebHeaders_Canoe_Sprint_1600x698 Website Hero Image Riley Fitzsimmons
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Website Bio Headshots Canoe SprintRiley Fitzsimmons
Medal Tally
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Athlete Introduction

Fast Facts

Sport: Canoe – Sprint  
Olympic History: Rio 2016  
Highlights: Coming fourth at Rio 2016 and becoming World Champion K4 1000 in 2017
Coach: James Owens  
Year Born: 1996 
State Born: New South Wales    

Riley Fitzsimmons has been an apprentice in more ways than one. The surf lifesaving champion started kayaking to improve his surf ski skills and off the water, he’s studied a carpentry and construction apprenticeship.

Fitzsimmons credits Olympic bronze medallist Lachlan Tame as his greatest influence, with the ‘master’ kayaker and Avoca Beach SLSC teammate responsible for teaching Fitzsimmons how to paddle.   

With dreams of going to the Olympic Games, Fitzsimmons turned to kayaking in 2012 but continues to compete for Avoca Beach SLSC and amongst others, took out the men's surf ski world title at the 2018 Lifesaving World Championships.

In 2015, he partnered with Jordan Wood and won K2 1000 metres gold at the Under 23 Canoe Sprint World Championships.  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Working the angles and finding that rhythm and flow

A post shared by Riley Fitzsimmons (@rileyfitzz) on


Fitzsimmons debuted on the Australian senior canoe sprint team in the same year and went on to make his Olympic debut the following year at Rio 2016.

Fitzsimmons and Wood put themselves on the Rio radar when they won the first Grand Prix regatta of the 2016 season. The duo defeated 2015 World Championships silver medallists and mentor, Tame and triple Olympian, Ken Wallace.  

At Rio 2016, Fitzsimmons teamed up with Wallace, Wood and Jacob Clear in the K4 1000m. The crew went down fighting in the final to finish fourth behind Germany, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

The Olympic debutante came away feeling disappointed with his result saying, "Coming fourth made it really difficult to find the motivation to get back in the boat and do it all again, after you've given your all and come away empty-handed."

But he was able to dig deep and get back into the water and in 2017, experienced success at the World Championships winning gold in the K4 1000 metres with Wood, Murray Stewart and Ken Wallace.

The same year, Fitzsimmons and Wood also won K2 1000 bronze at the Under 23 World Championships.  

In 2019, Fitzsimmons won gold in the K4 500 at his final Under 23 World Championships and went on to finish fifth in the men's K2 1000 together with Wood at the World Championships, securing Australia an Olympic quota spot in the process.


Fitzsimmons with his long-term K2 partner and 'best mate', Wood, won their selection to Tokyo when they claimed K2 1000 gold at the 2020 Australian Championships in a time of 3 min 12.04sec, with the duo overcoming newcomers Tom Green and Jean van der Westhuyzen who finished second by a 1.05sec margin.

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What do you enjoy most about competing?

I love the team boats because of the camaraderie and mateship you create with your teammates. I've been paddling the K2 with Jordan Wood for four years now and we've become the best of mates who have gone on to achieve great results and have some great times!

What is your hidden talent?

I don't think anyone could beat me in a dumpling eating contest

What is your most memorable sporting moment?

Watching Michael Phelps performance at the Beijing 2008 Olympics where he won eight gold medals and achieved seven world records. It was the most dominant performance I've ever seen.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Dream big because there are no limits

Results Table
[{"game_info":{"game_id":3016,"game_year":2016,"game_name":"Rio 2016"},"game_events":[{"event_info":{"event_id":"a1T7F0000031IhQUAU","event_name":"K-4 - 1000m - Men","event_final_placing":"4\/14","event_medal":null},"event_records":[{"round_id":34232,"round_name":"Final A","round_notes":"WALLACE, K; FITZSIMMONS, R; CLEAR J; WOOD, J","round_score":"3:06.731","round_result":"4"},{"round_id":34231,"round_name":"Semifinal 1","round_notes":"WALLACE, K; FITZSIMMONS, R; CLEAR J; WOOD, J","round_score":"2:58.222","round_result":"1"},{"round_id":34230,"round_name":"Heat 1","round_notes":"WALLACE, K; FITZSIMMONS, R; CLEAR J; WOOD, J","round_score":"2:55.666","round_result":"3"}]}]}]