The World Stands Up. Black Lives Matter

Submitted by admin on Mon, 06/29/2020 - 13:18
Hero Image
Title
Anant Singh - Video Vision
Article Introduction

By Anant Singh
IOC Member in South Africa

 

Content

The last 20 days since the slaying of George Floyd in the USA has been a revelation, with an outpouring of humanity all around the world, a solidarity that is long overdue.

As a South African, I reflect on my life as part of the oppressed majority that endured the harshness of legislated racism: apartheid. Brutality, oppression and violent authority were the tools of perpetrators, those who had the protection of the law and who used it very effectively, that cost thousands, mostly black people, their lives.

It was during this period that our leaders, Nelson Mandela and others, were incarcerated and organisations under the banner of liberation movements were banned. But, no matter how powerful, armed and hateful the regime was, we always knew that one day our freedom would come. In 1961 Nelson Mandela said, “No power on earth can stop an oppressed people determined to win their freedom.”

Reflecting on these inspiring words, in 1985 I made the first-ever anti-apartheid film in South
Africa and did it while being pursued by the police’s Special Branch. It is the story of a black farm worker who dares to ask his white right-wing employer for more supplies because he cannot manage with what has been given. And that simple gesture ends with his murder.

The film follows the unsuccessful attempts to have the farmer charged, but even when a sympathetic clergyman switches sides, nothing happens. It is clear, then, that the matter can only be resolved by anarchy.

I refer, of course, to Place of Weeping, a film I managed to get released in the USA, its premiere in New York attended by Martin Luther King Jnr III and several other civil activists.

At the time, I did several local and national radio interviews and what struck me most was the strong and powerful voice of black people across America who had seen the film and compared the atrocity of what we were experiencing in South Africa to their own even during those days.

It was clear that racism was alive and well in many communities across the USA. For me, that came as a shock, but what is even more disturbing for me now, in 2020, is that the situation has not changed.

My body of work in film has been largely dedicated to telling stories, stories that celebrate the people and events of our liberation. One such narrative is that of the black youth who rebelled against the authorities when they were forced to learn Afrikaans, the language of the oppressors.

On 16 June 1976, a cold winter’s day, students in Soweto marched to deliver a petition to the Education authorities. It was then everything fell apart. They were met with police brutality, 69 individuals killed for their convictions.

We salute these young heroes today, the 44th anniversary of one of the most harrowing incidents in South Africa’s history.

Sarafina! was the film I made saluting these young heroes. These teenagers put their lives on the line and were at the forefront of the liberation – they are the heroes of our struggle. 

In the past weeks, we have seen people around the world stand up against the brutality that led to the killing of George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks and so many others whose names are not known to us.

The tipping point for our freedom may have been in 1976, but it would be another two decades before those ideals were realised. I hope that the actions and introspections required today provide quicker outcomes. We simply cannot continue to lose any more lives.

What is of significance today is that now there are protests around the world, and we are able to see the unanimity of support from all race groups, particularly among the youth, in the almost global stand against discrimination, gender-based and all forms of violence.

It is these individuals who are taking the future into their hands, and that this is finally finding a foothold in other sectors, such as the environment, and in support for green resources, bodes very well for the future.

Good values, ethics, morals and kindness have been subjugated by arrogance, greed, hypocrisy and dishonesty. And it is this that has led to the growth of the right-wing nationalism in so many countries around the world.

My film 'Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom,' is based on the autobiography of Nelson Mandela. On 5 August 1962, he was arrested and incarcerated, sentenced to life in prison, and serving
a total of 27 years.

During his imprisonment, he identified as a key pillar to our freedom, and a way in which our people can come together as a unified nation, the need to dispel the fear of the white minority, the fear that black South Africans would seek revenge. To this end, when Mandela stepped out of that prison, he forgave all who had visited this great injustice upon his people, his colleagues and comrades, and to him.

“To be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the lives of others.” These are the words Mandela spoke when he was released on 10 February 1990.

Ubuntu is a South African saying, a notion that suggests that I am, simply because you are.

That we are all connected, that we need each other to exist. That our every action has an effect on the humanity of the world. Today, ubuntu is more relevant than it has ever been.

As I look at the United States today and its journey to so-called “freedom” for all who live in it, I am able to reflect on the cruelties meted out not only to its indigenous First Nations people, the near annihilation of those communities, but also to its slave population, predominately from Africa and the Caribbean, their violent oppression and so-called subsequent emancipation.

It has all been largely part of “the show”. Racism has continued to thrive across America, violence and brutality the undiscussed norm – until 26 May 2020.

Now we have an all-embracing global community, mainly young people, protesting for change across the world and we are beginning to see, for the first time ever, symbols such as the Confederate flag and perpetrators of violence being called to book, with even their likenesses being torn from their pedestals of power.
 
It seems to me that this is the introspection that is needed. Sadly, even in my own country, now in the 82nd day of lockdown, the violence against our people has once again been largely by those in authority, this time being police and military. That these spheres of public service are dominated by black officials is a particularly tragic irony.

On 10 May 1994 Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as the first democratic president of South Africa. In his inauguration address, he said, “We have triumphed in the effort to implant hope in the breasts of the millions of our people.

We enter into a covenant that we shall build the society in which all South Africans, both black and white, will be able to walk tall, without any fear in their hearts, assured of their inalienable right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world.”

His was a profound message for all South Africans, one that should continue to be embraced by us and all people of the world.

While Mandela was still in prison, I planned to make a film of one of South Africa’s most prolific books, Cry, the Beloved Country, written by Alan Paton almost 100 years ago in which he added his voice to our freedom and formed the Liberal Party.

The closing lines in both the book and the film are: “For it is the dawn that has come, as it has
come for a thousand centuries, never failing. But when that dawn will come, of our emancipation, from the fear of bondage and the bondage of fear, why, that is the secret.”

Prophetic words ringing true today, for all the people of the world.

My films reflect the people of my country, mainly black. I am privileged to have been able to highlight their stories. Many of us are coming together around the world for our black brothers and sisters, to make a difference. We need more.

BLACK LIVES MATTER.

Anant Singh is an IOC Member for South Africa. He is also South Africa’s pre-eminent film producer having produced more than 80 films including 1984’s “A Place for Weeping” – the first anti-apartheid film produced entirely in South Africa. 

Admired by the late Nelson Mandela, Anant was granted film rights for his autobiography “Long Walk to Freedom” which was released in 2013.

He has championed social justice causes in South Africa for many decades and has served in a variety of roles for numerous charitable causes including the Nelson Mandela Foundation. 

He is Chair of the IOC’s Communications Commission and is a member of several other IOC Commissions: The Olympic Channel, the Digital and Technology Commission, and the Coordination Commission for the 2028 Los Angeles Olympic Games. 

Anant Singh
Durban
16 June 2020

AOC hails winning bid for the Women's Football World Cup

Submitted by admin on Fri, 06/26/2020 - 08:48
Hero Image
Title
Matildas - FFA
Article Introduction

The Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) has congratulated Football Federation Australia (FFA) on its winning bid with Football New Zealand to host the FIFA Women’s World Cup in Australia and New Zealand in 2023.

Content

AOC President John Coates says the decision by FIFA overnight has demonstrated Australia’s capacity to mount a compelling case for major global sporting showcases. 

“This decision will deliver what could be a golden decade for Australian sport. It will be a magnificent boost for women’s football in Australia and I have no doubt that as hosts, Australia and our New Zealand cousins will deliver an outstanding tournament.”

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Those ‘we’re hosting the @fifawomensworldcup’ feels! Congratulations @thematildas #AsOne 🥳👏🏽

A post shared by Australian Olympic Team (@ausolympicteam) on


“It’s wonderful news for our Matildas who enjoy such enormous support from the Australian community and who inspire young women to get active and get involved in sport.

“Looking further ahead, I can see a ten-year runway taking us from 2023 with the Women’s Football World Cup, a year earlier the FIBA Women’s Basketball World Cup in 2022, potentially the Rugby World Cup for men in 2027 and ultimately the jewel in the crown with the Olympic Games in Brisbane in 2032. The benefits will continue beyond.

“There’s no question the world looks at Australia as a sports-loving country, capable of delivering the biggest events to the highest standard. We are viewed as a very safe pair of hands and of course, we are a wonderful destination for sports fans from around the world.

“The potential for this golden decade is extraordinary. We have the ability to supercharge sport, unite Australians and deliver a boost to the Australian economy with jobs and tourism. This decade can deliver a lasting legacy for sport, the economy and the community.


“Given the challenges we have all faced, and that Australia has managed so well, the prospect of the world looking to Australia to provide the way forward through sport is genuinely exciting.

“Australia has demonstrated time and again our capacity to host these global events. The ‘best ever’ Sydney 2000 Olympics, a record-breaking Rugby World Cup in 2003 and more recently the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast in 2018.

“From an Olympic perspective, we are in a conversation with the IOC’s Future Host Commission with the support of all three levels of government. 

Discussions are paused as the world deals with the pandemic but at an appropriate point, we will reconvene and put forward are credentials to deliver an Olympic Games in Queensland that meets the IOC’s goal of an affordable Games that will be cost neutral from an operational perspective.

“For now though, let’s celebrate a magnificent effort by the FFA and Football New Zealand to bring this wonderful tournament here and for Australian sport to enjoy the benefits that flow from.

FAQs - Jpn - Australian Olympic Connect | 友だち 2020

Submitted by admin on Thu, 06/25/2020 - 09:53
Hero Image
Title
Australian Schools Connect FAQs JPN
Article Introduction

ともだち2020は、国と国の間の基盤となっている友情と関係を元に構築されています

Content
Title
よくある質問
Content List Items
プログラムに参加対象は?

10-16歳の学生が通っている日本語プログラムを実施しているオーストラリアの学校、または英語教育を実施している日本の学校はプログラムに参加対象です。

年齢 日本 オーストラリア
10-11 小 5 5年目
11-12 小 6 6年目
12-13 中 1 7年目
13-14 中2 8年目
14-15 中3 9年目
15-16 高1 10年目

 

年齢制限はありますか?

10〜16歳の学生を歓迎します。

プログラムにおける教育の目的は何ですか?

•    世界中の若者を団結させ、オリンピックの精神とオリンピックの原則(卓越性、尊敬、友情)を祝い、促進する
•    学校に国際交流の活動拠点を提供する
•    オーストラリアと日本人の学生がグローバルな認識を広げ、オーストラリアの学生が日本の文化と伝統についてもっと学び、日本人の学生がオーストラリアの文化と伝統についてもっと学ぶことができるような機会を提供する
•    教師が言語クラスの異文化学習の成果を向上させ、オリンピック運動を応援し、祝う機会を提供する
•    オリンピック開催国との強力な国際関係の発展を支援する

私のクラスは他のクラスとどのようにマッチングされますか?

クラスは学生の年齢または学年に応じてマッチングします。 教員同士はオンラインで紹介され、相互の連絡先とメールアドレスを交換の上、マッチングされたクラスとコミュニケーションを図ることができます。

年齢 日本 オーストラリア
10-11 小 5 5年目
11-12 小 6 6年目
12-13 中 1 7年目
13-14 中2 8年目
14-15 中3 9年目
15-16 高1 10年目

 

マッチングした後、どのように進めますか?

クラスは、教員によって相互に合意されたプラットフォームを介して連絡をとります。教師と生徒は、国際的な「ともだち」から直接学び、情報を共有することができます。

コミュニケーションオプションには(これらに限定されないが)、適切なプライバシー許可が付与されていることを条件として、電子メール、ビデオ会議、ビデオクリップ交換、インスタントメッセージングが含まれます。

生徒はクラスとして、教員のメールアドレスを介して直接コミュニケーション(英語または日本語)を取れます。 AOCは、学生の下の名前だけをコミュニケーションに使用することを推奨しています。マッチングされた各クラスの生徒は個人的に繋がることはできません。コミュニケーションは、教員のメールアドレスまたはその他の形式の合意されたコミュニケーションを介してのみ行われます。

教員にはどのようなリソースが提供されますか?

教員には、有意義なコラボレーションを促進するための推奨テーマと焦点を備えた包括的なコミュニケーションガイドが提供されます。 ガイドに含まれる内容は、オーストラリア先住民文化、各学校内で参加されたスポーツ、オリンピックをテーマにした活動のアイデア、オリンピックの日、そしてオリンピックの価値などがあります。

プログラムの実行時間はどれくらいですか?

教員は、学校の交流が開始されてからプログラムが正式に終了するまで、2週間に1回は通信することに同意する必要があります。 コミュニケーションの適切なタイムラインについて合意することは、両国の教育者の責任です。

重要な日付

2020年のパイロットプログラム(20の学校が参加するように招待されている)

6月26日                           登録受付開始 7月23日                            登録締め切り 7月24日〜8月24日        クラスがマッチングされ、教育者が紹介される 7月24日〜10月31日       パイロットプログラム 10月31日〜11月15日       パイロットプログラムのレビューとフィードバック

プログラムの推薦

ともだち2020は、「国際オリンピック委員会」、「日本オリンピック委員会」、「東京オリンピック組織委員会」に承認されました。 同時に、プログラムは在日オーストラリア大使館、在豪日本大使館および日本の文部科学省のサポートも受けています。 日本大使館、「日本とオーストラリアの地方自治体評議会」(CLAIR)、および「オーストラリアの日本語教師協会」は、両国の学校にこの素晴らしい機会を成功させるために必要なつながりを提供しています。

プログラムのレビューとフィードバック

プログラムの期間中、AOCは定期的に教育者と連絡を取り合い、プログラムが適切に実行されていることを確認し、問題が発生した場合に必要な支援を提供します。

プログラムが終了すると、学校は、プログラムで経験した機会や結果、課題などについてのフィードバックをすることができます。

プログラムの正式な完了後のコミュニケーションは、教育者の裁量に任されています。

FAQs - Aus - Australian Olympic Connect | 友だち 2020

Submitted by admin on Thu, 06/25/2020 - 09:37
Hero Image
Title
Australian Schools Connect FAQs AUS
Article Introduction

友だち 2020 signifies the foundation of the program is built on friendship and relationship building between countries.

Content
Title
FAQs
Content List Items
Who is eligible to participate in the program?

Australian Schools with a Japanese Language program and Japanese Schools with an English Language program with students between 10-16 years of age.

Age Japan Australia
10-11 ELMN 5 Year 5
11-12 ELMN 6 Year 6
12-13 JHS 1 Year 7
13-14 JHS 2 Year 8
14-15 JHS 3 Year 9
15-16 HS 1 Year 10

 

Is there an age limit?

We welcome students aged between 10-16 years of age.

What are the educational outcomes?
  • Unite youth internationally to celebrate and promote the Olympic Spirit and the principles of Olympism (Excellence, Respect and Friendship)
  • Create a focal activity to connect schools internationally
  • Provide an opportunity for Australian and Japanese students to broaden their global awareness and learn about the Japanese culture and traditions and for Japanese students to learn more about Australian culture and traditions
  • Provide the opportunity for teachers to tailor intercultural learning outcomes for their language classes and share and celebrate the Olympic movement
  • Support the development of strong international relations with the Olympic Games host country
How will my class be matched?

Classes are matched according to their age or year level. Educator’s will be introduced online and given the respective contact details and email address of the other Educator to begin communicating with their connected class.

Age Japan Australia
10-11 ELMN 5 Year 5
11-12 ELMN 6 Year 6
12-13 JHS 1 Year 7
13-14 JHS 2 Year 8
14-15 JHS 3 Year 9
15-16 HS 1 Year 10

 

When we are matched how does it work?

The classes, through the educators will communicate via a mutually agreed platform, providing teachers and students the opportunity to directly learn and share information with their international friends.

Options include but not limited to email, video conference, video clip exchange, instant messaging, subject to the appropriate privacy permissions being granted.

Students, as a class, prepare communications (either in English or Japanese) which are sent directly via the Educators email address. The AOC recommend that only the first names of students are used in any communication.  Students within each of the matched classes are not able to connect individually, the communication is only via the Educator’s email address or other form of agreed communication.

What resources will Educators be provided with?

Educators are provided with a comprehensive communication guide with suggested themes and focal points to assist in meaningful collaboration. Australian Indigenous Culture, sports participated in within each school, Olympic Games themed activity ideas, Olympic Day and the values of Olympism will form part of the guide.

How long does the program run for?

Educators will agree to communicate at least once a fortnight at a minimum from the time the schools are connected to the formal program conclusion. It is the responsibility of the Educators in both countries to agree on a suitable timeline of communications.

Important Dates

Pilot Program in 2020 (20 schools invited to participate)

  • 26 June - Registrations open 
  • 23 July - Registrations close
  • 24 July - 24 August - Classes connected and educators introduced
  • 24 August - 31 October - Pilot program active
  • 31 October - 15 November - Pilot program review and feedback


Program in 2021

  • 19 April - Registrations Open
  • 31 May - Registrations Close
  • From 30 April - Classes Connected and Educators introduced
  • 1 May - 23 July - Program Active
  • 10 - 20 August - Program review and feedback

 

Program Endorsement

友だち 2020 has the approval of the International Olympic Committee, the Japanese Olympic Committee and the Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and has the support of the Australian Embassy in Japan and the Japanese Embassy in Australia and the Ministry of Education in Japan.

The Embassy’s, the Council of Local Authority of International Relations in Japan and Australia (CLAIR) and the Japanese Language Teachers Association in Australia have provided the vital connection required to successfully implement this outstanding opportunity for Schools in both countries.

Program Review and Feedback

Throughout the duration of the program, the AOC will check in with Educators regularly to ensure the program is running well and assist with any issues, should they arise.

Upon formal program completion, schools will be invited to provide feedback on program improvement and various challenges or opportunities that were encountered with key learnings and outcomes.

Communication following the formal program completion is at the discretion of the Educators.

Australian Olympic Connect Tomodachi 2020

Submitted by admin on Thu, 06/25/2020 - 08:21
Hero Image
Title
Australian Olympic Schools Connect
Article Introduction

We are excited to launch the Australian Olympic Connect | 友だち 2020 program
which links Australian schools with Japanese schools.

Content

日本とオーストラリアの学校を団結するプログラム、オーストラリア‘オリンピック・コネクト・ともだち2020発表を興奮しています。

Image
Title
Australian Olympic Schools Connect Header

The program is structured to promote the international connection between youth in two countries, fostering a safe cultural learning environment and providing a unique insight into each country’s customs, lifestyle and activities in the lead up to and during the Olympic Games.

このプログラムは、二国間の国際的な繋がりを促進し、安全で文化的な学習環境を育み,オリンピック の開始前と会期中に、各国の習慣、ライフスタイル、および活動に関する独自の考えを提供します。

"Like no other human activity, sport is about bringing people together in the spirit of friendship and respect."

Thomas Bach – President, IOC

他の人間の活動とは異なり、スポーツは人々を友情と尊敬の精神で結びつけること。
国際オリンピック委員会(IOC)
トマス・バーハ会長

 

Registration

Registrations are limited – take up this fantastic opportunity now!

 

Program Brochure

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Education Resources

XTM

Submitted by admin on Wed, 06/24/2020 - 13:05
Sponsor Introduction Content

At XTM Performance, we have a long history with the Olympics thanks to our founder Pete Forras being a former Australian Winter Olympian himself. This history has led to our 15-year relationship as official glove supplier to the Australian Winter Olympic Team, a relationship we pride and cherish.

As a leading Australian owned and Carbon Neutral snow and outdoor brand, we will endeavour to continue making products of gold-medal quality, in a sustainable and ethically responsible way - all from our beachside location in Torquay, Australia.

Tokyo Olympics? Scanlan will be apples

Submitted by admin on Wed, 06/24/2020 - 08:32
Hero Image
Title
Scanlan fires gun - Shooting Australia
Article Introduction

Picking and packing apples alongside her dad is not where you would expect to find a three-time Commonwealth Games gold medallist preparing for her second Olympic Games, but for trap shooter, Laetisha Scanlan, it’s all part of her plan to rise to the medal podium at the Tokyo Olympics.

Content

 

With the Olympics postponed by 12 months, the closest Scanlan will get to Japan at present is via a fuji apple, named after Japan's sacred mountain, Mount Fuji.

Apple picking became a necessity after her part-time job at a dry cleaning business in Seddon was suspended because of COVID-19. Afterall, there is a mortgage to pay after she and her partner Sam Waters bought a three-bedroom home in Emerald earlier this month.

But part-time work, either picking apples or operating the dry cleaning front desk, has become part of her life to ensure that trapshooting doesn’t become all-consuming.

The Berwick resident has also been assisting Olympians Russell and Lauryn Mark with their corporate shooting business but reduced her hours after recognising there was no escape from the sport having to be at the shooting range when she wasn’t training or competing.

“I realised, at the start of last year, that I needed more balance in my life so it wasn’t so shooting orientated. And I think the perfect thing to do was to have a part-time job that has no relationship with the sport so you can switch off for a bit. I think it keeps you more mentally fresh rather than thinking about shooting 24/7,” she explained.


“It’s one of those sports where it gives you the most amazing opportunities to travel and see the world and compete at an elite level. But I think I realised after Rio, that I needed a little more balance,” she added.

Even now with social restrictions being eased and ranges opening for use, Scanlan is taking a slow run-up to the Tokyo Games next year to ensure she peaks at the right time and not burn out prior to the competition.

With 13 years of international experience, both as a senior and junior trap athlete, Scanlan knows what it will take to reach her pinnacle goal of an Olympic gold medal.

But shooting is a fickle precision sport where the same six finalists could shoot three events on the same day and produce a string of different winners. 

“Sometimes, it’s just one target,” she says knowingly after personally experiencing the impact of one shot.

Having won a gold medal with Stacey Roiall in the women’s pairs at the 2010 Delhi Commonwealth Games and winning her first-ever World Cup gold medals in 2013 and 2014, Scanlan attended the 2014 Glasgow Commonwealth Games and thought she was eliminated at the end of the qualifying rounds until Canadian Susan Natrass capitulated at the end of her final 25 targets.

Scanlan qualified for the final after a shoot-off against India’s Shreyasi Singh before winning the semi-final round and then the gold medal match.

“I went in there thinking I’ve got nothing to lose. I’m going to give it my all and, being the underdog, I managed to win the final,” she said.

 

Then, four years later at the Gold Coast Commonwealth Games, Scanlan had to survive another qualifying round shoot-off against New Zealand’s Natalie Rooney to reach the final.

In the final, which doubled as her 28th birthday, Scanlan opened a healthy three target lead but it evaporated in the second half of the 50-shot final as Northern Ireland’s Kirsty Barr levelled the scores with Scanlan needing to hit her last target to win.

When the target exploded in a cloud of pink, Scanlan celebrated with a triple fist-pump while “Team Teasch” roared and celebrated wildly in the grandstand.

“The pressure was indescribable. To have all my friends and family there and to be shooting off against a good friend in Nat Rooney, the New Zealander, I just felt sick,” she recalled.

“I was so glad I won, not so much for me as an individual, but probably more for my family and friends because I felt like I had the weight of the world on me and I’m glad when it counted that I could perform and give that to them,” she said.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BEST BIRTHDAY EVER

A post shared by Laetisha (@teashy) on


While Scanlan has been a top-line international trap athlete for over 10 years, the course of her life could have taken a very different direction after competing at her first international championship as a junior in 2007 while in Year 12 at Haileybury College in Keysborough.

“I came dead last. It was probably the best thing that could have ever happened to me. It made me work harder and I guess lit a fire to do better. If I’d given up and said it was too hard, then I wouldn’t be where I am today,” she said.

She stuck at it and captured her first senior World Cup title in 2013 in Al Ain.

“I proved to myself that I was capable and worthy of being on the team. That started a really exciting journey for me because I had my own self-belief,” she said.

Her journey took her to the 2016 Rio Olympic Games where she was the top qualifier but finished fifth behind her gold-medal-winning Australian team-mate, Catherine Skinner.

“I just didn’t perform high enough to get myself into the medal opportunities,” she said.

This year’s Tokyo Olympic selection trials were always going to be a high-pressure event with Skinner, Scanlan and fellow Victorian Penny Smith contesting the two available selection positions.

Smith’s consistency earned her the automatic team selection position leaving Scanlan and Skinner duelling for the single remaining spot.
 

Scanlan fires in final World Cup before Rio

 

“Going into the last selection event, I knew it was going to be tough. We have such depth in our women trap shooters. It’s never going to be an easy run. It’s never ever going to be a free card into the Olympic team. I put a lot of pressure on myself and I’ve learned that’s probably not the best thing to do,” she said.

“I’m so grateful that the selectors have chosen me and given me the opportunity to go to Tokyo, and I really hope that I can perform at my best because I know my best is medal-worthy,” she added.

“Penny shot an amazing selection series and all credit goes to her. She definitely deserved the first spot. She made that a very, very easy decision. But the second spot was always going to be difficult and always going to be at the discretion of a panel.”

The Tokyo Olympics also sees the introduction of the Mixed Pairs where she is likely to be partnered with James Willett, while Smith is destined to be shooting alongside NSW’s Tom Grice

“I’ve always been jealous of the swimmers that have so many opportunities to compete at the Olympics. And it was so hard going into Rio knowing you had one opportunity and that was it for the next four years,” she said.

“It’s (the mixed pairs) is such a great opportunity for us as Australians to win medals. Penny and Gricey and myself and James, we’re world-class. We’ve both won world championships, so I think we are all going to go in quite favourable with the other teams.”

 

Scanlan says the postponement of the Olympics will help her and Willett develop a strong pairs partnership.

“I think chemistry is quite important. In an individual event I don’t really care if anyone hits or misses a target next to me. I do care if James hits or misses a target,” she said.

“As we have shot more together internationally, we kind of know how each other rolls now. We’re very yin and yang. James and I are very different shooters and different personalities but somehow, we gel perfectly together."

And then there is the silent understanding when at the height of competition.

“There’s not a lot of chat (on the range). There is just the look,” she said with a laugh.

Scanlan believes her Rio Games experience will be hugely beneficial for Tokyo.

“I was a baby. I was so fresh, and I went in there quite naïve and it’s taken me three to four years after Rio to realise that I have developed a lot as a shooter and I’ve grown up,” she admitted.

“That’s why I’m looking forward to Tokyo so much now because I know what Rio was, I know how I performed, I know why I did this, and I know why I did that. Now coming into Tokyo, I have so much knowledge and so much experience and I think it can only benefit me positively,” she said.

And hopefully she will be picking off targets as they soar across the Tokyo Olympic range just as easy as plucking apples off a tree.

Greg Campbell
Shooting Australia

Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia launches on Olympic Day 2020

Submitted by admin on Tue, 06/23/2020 - 12:28
Hero Image
Title
Amy Jones, John Coates and Matt Carroll at Optus Studios
Article Introduction

With Olympic Day being celebrated around the world today, June 23rd, our Federal Parliament has marked the occasion with the launch of the Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia.

Content

The Parliamentary Friendship Group (PFG) is a bi-partisan forum open to all Senators and Members which will promote the values of Olympism in Australia.

The objectives of the Group are:
•    to promote, raise awareness of and encourage participation in sport for benefits of health, longevity, fitness, skill, achievement, social interaction, wellbeing and other benefits of exercise for all individuals in Australia;
•    to promote the fundamental principles and values of Olympism in Australia, particularly in the fields of sport, health and education, by promoting Olympic sporting, health and educational programmes in all levels of schools, sports and physical education institutions and universities; and;
•    to recognise the heritage, culture and contribution of our nation’s first people, and to give practical support to the issue of indigenous reconciliation through sport.

The Co-chairs of the group are Bert van Manen MP (Liberal National Party), Federal Member for Forde and Graham Perrett MP (Labor), Federal Member for Moreton. The formation of the Group has been approved by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate.

AOC President John Coates AC welcomed the group, thanking them for their enthusiasm for the important role Olympic sports can play in the Australian community.

“This is a wonderful initiative and we look forward to this group growing into some very special in our Australian Parliament. Sport is such a unifying force for good – through improving the health and wellbeing of Australians, to inspiring our young people to be the very best they can be. 

“With around nine million Australians participating in Olympic sports and the exciting prospect of Australia once again hosting an Olympic Games in 2032, the formation of this Parliamentary Friendship Group tells us that we have much to look forward to, particularly as we emerge from the coronavirus.”

Bert van Manen says the Olympics is the ultimate dream for so many Australian athletes.
“We want to help them realise that dream right here in Australia. Sport unites all Australians and helps to build long lasting relationships and stronger communities which is why I’m such a big supporter of sports in my community of Forde.

“From grassroots community sport to the very elite levels, we are well positioned to do well and compete with the world,” he said. 

Graham Perrett says the Olympic Games send a message to all Australians.

“My top five moments by Australians at the Olympics are: Cathy Freeman lighting the Olympic cauldron then going on to win Olympic gold in Sydney in 2000; Keiren Perkins winning gold in 1996 against all odds; Debbie Flintoff-King winning gold in Seoul in 1988; and, fittingly last but not least, Steven Bradbury, winning  at the Winter Olympics in 2002 - Steven trained at Acacia Ridge in my electorate and his win is what the Olympics is really all about – never giving up.” 

The Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia was launched via a digital hook-up. Initially, some 30 MPs have joined the group, representing a broad cross-section of the Parliamentary landscape.

Olympic Day is celebrated globally, marking the founding of the modern Olympic Games on this date in 1894, ahead of the first modern Olympic Games in Athens in 1896.

Members of the Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia
Position Name Electorate
Co-Chair Mr Bert van Manen MP Member for Forde
Co-Chair Mr Graham Perrett MP Member for Morton
     
Committee Member Senator Andrew Bragg Senator for New South Wales
Committee Member The Honourable Don Farrell Senator for South Australia
Committee Member The Honourable James McGrath Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator Paul Scarr Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator Amanda Stoker Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator David Van Senator for Victoria
Committee Member Senator Murray Watt Senator for Queensland
     
Committee Member Mr Steve Georganas MP Member for Adelaide
Committee Member The Honourable Dr Andrew Leigh MP Member for Fenner
Committee Member Mr David Smith MP Member for Bean
Committee Member Mrs Melissa McIntosh MP Member for Lindsay
Committee Member Dr Katie Allen MP Member for Higgins
Committee Member Mr Luke Gosling OAM MP Member for Solomon
Committee Member Mr Ted O'Brien MP Member for Fairfax
Committee Member The Honourable Trevor Evans MP Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction & Environmental Mangement
Committee Member Mr Andrew Wallace MP Member for Fisher
Committee Member The Honourable Kevin Andrews MP Member for Menzies
Committee Member The Honourable Darren Chester MP Deputy Leader of the House, Minister for Defence Personnel & Veterans' Affairs
Committee Member Ms Angie Bell MP Member for Moncrieff
Committee Member The Honourable Julie Collins MP Member for Franklin
Committee Member Ms Maria Vamvakinou MP Member for Calwell
Committee Member The Honourable Steve Irons MP Assistant Minister for Vocational Education, Training and Apprenticeships
Committee Member Mr Andrew Laming MP Member for Bowman
Committee Member Mr Terry Young MP Member for Longman
Committee Member The Honourable Scott Buchholz MP Assistant Minister for Road Safety & Freight Transport
Committee Member The Honourable Shayne Neumann MP Member for Blair
Committee Member Mr Milton Dick MP Member for Oxley
Committee Member Ms Zali Steggall OAM MP OLY Member for Warringah
Committee Member The Honourable Richard Colbeck Minister for Youth and Sport, Minister for Aged Care & Senior Australians

Olympians and community share Olympic Day celebrations

Submitted by admin on Mon, 06/22/2020 - 20:27
Hero Image
Title
Olympic Day Live, hosted by Optus
Article Introduction

Australian Olympians and sports fans are celebrating Olympic Day today, with June 23rd marking the creation of the modern Olympic movement back in 1894.

Content

Olympic champions Ian Thorpe and Ellia Green will join host Mark Beretta for Olympic Day Live, hosted by Optus, broadcast on the AOC’s Facebook here at 12.30pm today, to share their Olympic experiences and check in with athletes and community members on their Olympic Day celebrations.

This year’s festivities have seen Olympians invite the public to join them in setting #OlympicDayGoals throughout June, setting challenges to be achieved by today, 23 June.

From Olympians learning instruments, juggling and attempting new athletic feats to school students setting reading, running and singing challenges, elite and community athletes alike joined in the spirit of the Olympic ideals.

AOC CEO Matt Carroll said Olympic Day is an opportunity to celebrate what the Olympics means to Australians.

“On Olympic Day, we recognise those remarkable Olympic moments from the 3988 Australians who have earned the right to call themselves Olympians,” Mr Carroll said. “We acknowledge the contribution of their sports, coaches, families, volunteers and supporters who all make up the Olympic movement in this country.   

“We also look to the future – to those athletes resuming their training and preparation for next year’s Tokyo Games, showing the determination to overcome this unique challenge, and lifting our spirits with their positive attitudes; and to everyone at the grassroots level getting back to their sport safely in the days and months ahead.

“I also want to congratulate all the athletes and community members who took part in the #OlympicDayGoals, to challenge themselves throughout June. Sport can play a vital role in bonding our communities and championing the way forward.”

Olympic kayaker Alyce Wood stepped outside her comfort zone for her #OlympicDayGoals – aiming to learn to play the ukulele by Olympic Day.

“Despite not having a musical bone in my body, I managed to achieve my goal of belting out a full song on the ukulele by today,” Wood said.

“It was a lot harder than I expected, but like with anything you’re new at, if you keep at it and keep at it, it will click. Even though trying something new that you’re not great at can feel daunting, I realised I could just have fun with it.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Alyce Wood (Burnett) (@alycewood_) on

“While my singing isn't great, it’s definitely inspiring me to try out some kayak karaoke when we’re on the water.

“Olympic Day this year is different – instead of counting down to the Games in a month, it’s been a time reset, giving us the chance to try some new things.

The Rio 2016 paddler, who has also been selected for Tokyo 2020, isn’t leaving her Olympic Day goal behind.

“I’m going to stick with it, pack it in my paddle bag when we’re back travelling and take it on tour.

“For so many athletes, your hobby is your physical activity – trying the uke has taught me it’s really helpful to engage in something else. Even though I’m not arty or musical, it’s so enjoyable and calming.”

Three-time Olympic diver Melissa Wu is also taking part in the Olympic Channel’s global workout, featuring Olympians from around the globe in a live workout through every time zone. You can tune in to Melissa’s workout 11am AEST at the Olympic Channel.

 

Tune to Olympic Day Live with Ian Thorpe, Ellia Green and Mark Beretta on Facebook, find out more about Olympic Day here and catch all the Olympic Day celebrations on the Australian Olympic Team social channels.

 

Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia

Submitted by admin on Sat, 06/20/2020 - 14:25
Hero Image
Title
Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia
Article Introduction

The Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia launched on Tuesday 23 June 2020 (Olympic Day) with Co-Chairs Bert van Manen MP, Member for Forde, and Graham Perrett MP, Member for Morton.

Content

Launch

 

Objectives

  • to promote, raise awareness of and encourage participation in sport for benefits of health, longevity, fitness, skill, achievement, social interaction, wellbeing and other benefits of exercise for all individuals in Australia;
  • to promote the fundamental principles and values of Olympism in Australia, particularly in the fields of sport, health and education, by promoting Olympic sporting, health and educational programmes in all levels of schools, sports and physical education institutions and universities; and
  • to recognise the heritage, culture and contribution of our nation’s first people, and to give practical support to the issue of indigenous reconciliation through sport.

Scope

The Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia will also serve to connect the Parliament with the broader remit of the Olympic Movement, including the role the AOC has to play and the value Olympism can contribute to Australian society

Members

Members of the Parliamentary Friends of the Olympic Movement in Australia
Position Name Electorate
Co-Chair Mr Bert van Manen MP Member for Forde
Co-Chair Mr Graham Perrett MP Member for Morton
     
Committee Member Senator Andrew Bragg Senator for New South Wales
Committee Member The Honourable Don Farrell Senator for South Australia
Committee Member The Honourable James McGrath Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator Paul Scarr Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator Amanda Stoker Senator for Queensland
Committee Member Senator David Van Senator for Victoria
Committee Member Senator Murray Watt Senator for Queensland
     
Committee Member Mr Steve Georganas MP Member for Adelaide
Committee Member The Honourable Dr Andrew Leigh MP Member for Fenner
Committee Member Mr David Smith MP Member for Bean
Committee Member Mrs Melissa McIntosh MP Member for Lindsay
Committee Member Dr Katie Allen MP Member for Higgins
Committee Member Mr Luke Gosling OAM MP Member for Solomon
Committee Member Mr Ted O'Brien MP Member for Fairfax
Committee Member The Honourable Trevor Evans MP Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction & Environmental Mangement
Committee Member Mr Andrew Wallace MP Member for Fisher
Committee Member The Honourable Kevin Andrews MP Member for Menzies
Committee Member The Honourable Darren Chester MP Deputy Leader of the House, Minister for Defence Personnel & Veterans' Affairs
Committee Member Ms Angie Bell MP Member for Moncrieff
Committee Member The Honourable Julie Collins MP Member for Franklin
Committee Member Ms Maria Vamvakinou MP Member for Calwell
Committee Member The Honourable Steve Irons MP Assistant Minister for Vocational Education, Training and Apprenticeships
Committee Member Mr Andrew Laming MP Member for Bowman
Committee Member Mr Terry Young MP Member for Longman
Committee Member The Honourable Scott Buchholz MP Assistant Minister for Road Safety & Freight Transport
Committee Member The Honourable Shayne Neumann MP Member for Blair
Committee Member Mr Milton Dick MP Member for Oxley
Committee Member Ms Zali Steggall OAM MP OLY Member for Warringah
Committee Member The Honourable Richard Colbeck Minister for Youth and Sport, Minister for Aged Care & Senior Australians