Omega

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:50
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OMEGA are a valued Olympic sponsor and official Olympic timekeeper
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Prestige Swiss watchmaker OMEGA was the first company to be entrusted with the official timekeeping of all disciplines at the Los Angeles Olympic Games in 1932. Since this time, OMEGA has held official timekeeper status at an unprecedented 24 Olympic Games, including Melbourne in 1956.

Among the 663 chronographs and other timekeeping devices that OMEGA dispatched to Melbourne at this time, was the world’s first semi-automatic swimming timer with digital display. OMEGA even launched a watch in Melbourne’s honour to commemorate the brand’s history-making achievements during the 1956 Games.

OMEGA will continue its all-important timekeeping role at the PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Winter Games and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

Intel

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:49
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Intel are a valued Australian Olympic Team Partner for 2017-2024
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Intel joined “The Olympic Partner” (TOP) worldwide sponsorship programme in June 2017, becoming a Worldwide TOP Partner through 2024.

This partnership will transform the Olympic Games and the Olympic experience. Intel will focus primarily on infusing its 5G platforms, VR, 3D and 360 content development platforms, artificial intelligence platforms and drones, along with other silicon solutions to enhance the Olympic Games.

As a Worldwide TOP Partner, Intel will support the National Olympic Committees and their teams around the world, as well as the IOC and the Organisers of the Olympic Games. Intel’s global activation rights will include the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018, the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022 and the Paris 2024 Olympic Games.

Bridgestone

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:48
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Bridgestone has signed an agreement through to 2024, and will become a Worldwide TOP Partner. The product categories covered by the agreement include: seismic isolation bearings, non-motorised bicycles, and the full range of tyres manufactured by Bridgestone.

Bridgestone is the world’s largest tyre and rubber company. In addition to tyres, which are used in a wide variety of applications, Bridgestone manufactures a broad range of diversified products that include industrial rubber and chemical products, and sporting goods.

As a Worldwide TOP Partner, Bridgestone will partner with the IOC and all 204 National Olympic Committees and their Olympic teams.

Bridgestone will also partner with the organisers of future Olympic Games, , PyeongChang 2018 and Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games, as well as the 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games, the host cities of which have yet to be elected. Bridgestone will supply tyres and related services to support the transport operations at Games time, including the vehicles for the athletes, media and officials.

Atos

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:47
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Atos are a valued Australian Olympic Team Partner for 2017 - 2020
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Atos will provide Integration Services and Systems Management Services, Core Hosting Services and key Games-related applications and associated services for the XXIII Olympic Winter Games (2018) in PyeongChang and the Games of the XXXII Olympiad (2020) in Tokyo.

Atos has been a key technology provider for the Olympic Movement since 1989, when the company provided services to the Barcelona 1992 Organising Committee. Atos became the Olympic Movement’s Worldwide Information Technology Partner in 2001.

IOC President Thomas Bach said: “Technology is critical to the success of each edition of the Olympic Games. We are delighted that we will be able to continue relying on Atos and its vast experience to deliver flawless, innovative IT services.”

Gerhard Heiberg, Chairman of the Marketing Commission, said: “Atos provides the Olympic Movement with confidence and security by supplying dependable IT systems. After many years of working with Atos, who have consistently delivered on one of the biggest global stages, we are delighted that we will continue to partner with them long into the future.”

Atos leads in applying innovative yet proven business technology, such as secure cloud services, in highly complex projects, bringing together processes, technologies and people.

Patrick Adiba, Group Executive Vice President Human Resources - Olympics & Major Events, commented: “The Games cannot happen today without intensive use of complex information technology. I am delighted we will continue our partnership long into the future, giving us the opportunity for us to share our ambition for making IT at the Games even better thanks to our approach to innovation combined with the highest quality standards in delivery and operations. We will deliver the services over the cloud, providing more efficiency, agility and productivity.”

visit: atos.net

Alibaba Group

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:43
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Alibaba Group are a valued Australian Olympic Team Partner for 2017-2028.
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Joining The Olympic Partner (TOP) worldwide sponsorship programme in January 2017, Alibaba became the official “Cloud Services” and “E-Commerce Platform Services” Partner, as well as a Founding Partner of the Olympic Channel.

Alibaba is the first company to make a long-term commitment to the IOC through 2028 and the first Chinese company to commit to the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022. Alibaba will support the organisers of each edition of the Olympic Games, and the Olympic Movement around the world. These rights will include advertising and promotional use of Olympic marks and imagery from the Olympic Games as well as marks from the National Olympic Committees.

Through the partnership, Alibaba’s contributions to the Olympic Movement will include best-in-class cloud computing infrastructure and cloud services to help the Olympic Games operate more efficiently, effectively and securely, including supporting big data analytics requirements; the creation of a global e-commerce platform for Olympic stakeholders to engage and connect with fans seeking official Olympic licensed products manufactured by the Olympic parties’ official licensees, and selected sports products, on a worldwide basis; an leveraging Alibaba’s leading digital media technologies and know-how to develop and customise the Olympic Channel for a Chinese audience.

Alibaba’s global activation rights will include the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018, the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020, the Olympic Winter Games Beijing 2022 and the Olympic and Olympic Winter Games in 2024, 2026 and 2028 in cities yet to be selected by the IOC.

Coca Cola

Submitted by admin on Mon, 05/20/2019 - 22:39
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Coca-Cola are a valued Australian Olympic Team Partner for 2013-2020
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The Coca-Cola Company is proud to maintain the longest continuous relationship with the Olympic Movement of any company. The company sponsored the 1928 Olympic Games in Amsterdam, and has supported every Olympic Games since. Coca-Cola beverages refresh Olympic athletes, officials and spectators with its beverages during the Olympic Games.

The company has developed a strong tradition of creating programmes and events to bring the spirit of the Games to consumers in Olympic host cities and around the world.

As well as working with the Australian Olympic Committee, Coca-Cola works closely with National Olympic Committees to support athletes and teams in approximately 190 countries. Coca-Cola became a charter member of the TOP Programme in 1986 under the exclusive product category of non-alcoholic beverages.

In 2005, The Coca-Cola Company and the IOC extended their partnership agreement for an unprecedented 12 years until 2020. Powerade (www.powerade.com.au), The Coca-Cola Company’s sports drink will be supporting Australia’s Olympic team as they prepare and compete in the 2018 Olympic Winter Games and the 2020 Olympic Games.

The Coca-Cola Company is a valued Australian Team Partner for 2013-2020.

The Coca-Cola Company has a wide range of beverages designed to meet the refreshment needs of our consumers, with options to suit every lifestyle. Whether you’re looking to energise, hydrate, nourish, relax or simply enjoy, we have a beverage for any and all occasions. Water, diet carbonated beverages, carbonated beverages, juices, tea and sports drinks are all included in our portfolio of beverages. The company has local operations in over 200 countries around the world.

Cycling

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 03:55
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Cycling Preview Card
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
18
Silver Medals
19
Gold Medals
14
Sport Introduction

Australia and Olympic Cycling

Australia has a long and proud tradition in Olympic cycling. In terms of medals won per events contested, cycling is easily one of the most successful Olympic sports for Australia.

Edgar “Dunc” Gray became Australia’s first cycling medallist in 1928. Gray finished third in the 1000 metres time trial in Amsterdam, and then won gold an Olympiad later in Los Angeles. In Helsinki 1952 Russell Mockridge won gold in the time trial and then joined with Lionel Cox to finish first in the tandem. Mockridge, who later died in a road racing accident, is still arguably Australia’s greatest all-round cyclist. Ian Browne and Tony Marchant repeated the win in the tandem in Melbourne 1956.

Australian cyclists won three silver medals in Munich 1972 before again claiming gold in Los Angeles 1984. Michael Turtur, Kevin Nichols, Dean Woods and Michael Grenda overcame the home support and superior racing bikes of the Americans to win the team pursuit in Los Angeles. Woods again made the podium four years later in Seoul placing second in the individual pursuit and winning bronze as a member of the team pursuit. Also in 1988, Martin Vinnicombe won silver in the 1000m time trial.

The first Australian to win an Olympic gold medal on the road was Kathy Watt in Barcelona 1992. Watt also won a silver medal in the individual pursuit making her the first Australian to win two individual cycling medals at the same Olympics. Australia’s next cycling gold medal came in the madison at Sydney 2000 when Brett Aitken and Scott McGrory combined for an emotion-charged victory.

Athens 2004 saw a “gold-rush” for Australia with a record six gold medals. Ryan Bayley became the first Australian to win two individual cycling gold medals and he did it at the same Olympics, winning both the men’s sprint and the keirin. Anna Meares won her first gold medal with a world record time in the 500m time trial and Sarah Carrigan emulated Kathy Watt’s win in the women’s road race. Stuart O’Grady and Graeme Brown won gold in the madison, and Brown won another gold medal in the team pursuit with Peter Dawson, Brett Lancaster, Luke Roberts, Stephen Wooldridge and Bradley McGee. McGee has now won the most Olympic cycling medals for Australia with one gold medal, one silver and three bronze medals.

Although Australia went into Beijing 2008 with high medal hopes, the Beijing track delivered a number of near misses and disappointments. Nonetheless, the heroic performance of Meares was one of the most inspiring performances in Australian Olympic history. Meares suffered a broken neck in a race crash just seven months before the Games but trained tenaciously to get back on the bike for Beijing. She completed one of the greatest comebacks in living memory to claim silver behind British cyclist Victoria Pendleton in the Sprint.

Four years on and with the home town crowd cheering Pendleton home, Meares pulled off an amazing victory to claim gold in the women’s sprint at the London 2012 Games having already won bronze in the team sprint with teammate Kaarle McCulloch. In doing so Meares became the first female cyclist from any country to win five Olympic track medals and the first to medal at three Games.

The Australian team pursuit quartet of Glenn O’Shea, Jack Bobridge, Rohan Dennis and Michael Hepburn won Australia’s only silver on the track behind a British team that broke the world record in the final. Shane Perkins claimed bronze in the men’s sprint while Olympic debutant Annette Edmondson also finished with bronze in the omnium’s Games debut.

Sam Willoughby won Australia’s first BMX medal since the sport’s inception in 2008 after finishing second behind Beijing gold medallist Maris Strombergs of Latvia in the London final. Teammate Caroline Buchanan placed fifth in the final of the women’s event.

Six-time Olympian Stuart O’Grady rode a tactical men’s road race to finish sixth while Michael Rogers matched that result in the men’s time trial. On debut Shara Gillow finished the women’s time trial in 13th while also claiming the best result in the women’s road race coming in 38th.

Australia is yet to win an Olympic medal in the mountain bike event with Rebecca Henderson 25th and Daniel McConnell 21st in London.

Olympic History

Cycling events have been present at every staging of the Modern Olympics since Athens 1896. Women’s cycling was introduced in Los Angeles 1984 and mountain bike made its Olympic debut at Atlanta 1996. With the advent of professional cyclists in Atlanta, Olympic cycling grew in popularity. It didn’t take long for the professionals to make an impact at the Olympics with Miguel Indurain of Spain winning the road time trial in Atlanta 1996 and German Jan Ullrich winning the road race and finishing second, one place ahead of American Lance Armstrong, in the road time trial in Sydney 2000.

The traditional gender inequality of cycling is set to be smashed with drastic changes to the London 2012 Olympic program. In Beijing there were only 35 female track cycling competitors, but in London this will rise to 84. The IOC has removed the individual pursuit, points race and men’s madison events to make way for three new women’s events. This evens the ledger with five events for both men and women: sprint, team sprint, keirin, team pursuit and omnium.

Omnium is a reasonably new event that sees six disciplines collide in an event attractive to endurance riders. The International Cycling Union (UCI) and the IOC hope the event will make for exciting television viewing. The innovative omnium reflects the latest IOC trend of adopting engaging events. The discipline of BMX was added to the cycling program for Beijing 2008, replacing individual time trials on the velodrome.

Sport Format

There are four cycling disciplines- BMX, mountain bike, road and track.

BMX

There are two BMX (Bicycle Moto Cross) events on the Olympic program - Elite Men (19 years and older) and Elite Women (19 years and older).

BMX races are held on short outdoor tracks that include jumps, bumps and tight banked corners. Eight riders compete in each heat, with the top four qualifying for the next round. Races take about 40 seconds.

Mountain Bike

Mountain bike competitors complete laps of an undulating race circuit designed to produce a specific winning time rather than a specific distance. Races are over 40-50km for men, and 30-40km for women. The riders start together and must complete a set number of laps of the course. The winner is the first past the finish line.

The number of laps depends on the track and weather conditions and a decision on the number of laps can be made by organisers at the latest two hours before the start of the race to determine the optimum finish time:

              Minimum      Optimum      Maximum
Men        2h:00           2h:15          2h:30
Women   1h:45           2h:00          2h:15

Men and women compete separately and riders are seeded on a starting grid according to their current world ranking.

Road

The road competition consists of the road race and individual time trial for both men and women. The road race is a mass start event and the first cyclist to cross the finish line at the end of the total distance is declared the winner. The men’s race is approximately 230km and the women’s, approximately 120km.

The Time Trial is a race against the clock over a shorter distance. For the individual time trial, men cover approximately 48km and women cover about 24km. Cyclists start at 90 second intervals and race against the clock. The cyclist with the fastest time is declared the winner.

Track

Sprint 
The sprint is a classic short distance event in which two or more riders cover three laps. Only the final 200 metres is timed. The special requirements in the sprint are strength and speed. The key is tactics. Sudden and dramatic changes in speed, standstill attempts, and feints are typical ways to surprise an opponent. Riders obtain a seeding through the qualifying 200 metre flying time trial with 18 men and 12 women qualifying for the first round.  From quarter final stage onwards rivals match up in best of three heats to determine progress to the following round.

Keirin 
Keirin was created in the 1940’s and is the Japanese version of the traditional sprint event. Up to seven riders compete over 2000m. A special motorised bike called a derny leads the field for the first 1,400m starting at 30km/h and bringing the riders up to a speed of 50km/h. Cyclists manoeuvre for the best position before the derny leaves the track. It is then an all up frantic sprint for the finish line. The first two riders across the line in the qualifying heats go through to the first round with the losers contesting repechage heats. The two winners of each of three repechage heats go through to the first round. In the first round the first three riders in each of the two heats qualify for the medal final and the losers ride off for 7-12 place.

Team Sprint 
The Team Sprint pits two teams of three riders against each other and the clock over three laps of the track. The task of the starting rider is to get out of the gate cleanly and bring the team up to high speed as quickly as possible. After one lap the first rider peels off to allow the second rider to make the pace. This rider completes their effort with one lap to go and then it’s up to the final cyclist, traditionally a time trial specialist, to finish off. The leading rider must not swing up until a full lap is complete and must peel off between an area of 15 metres before and after their start line, otherwise the team will be disqualified. The fastest eight teams go through from the qualifying round to the first round and from there, the fastest two winning teams contest the race for gold and silver and the other two winners contest the race for bronze.

Team Pursuit
Four endurance cyclists comprise a pursuit team and their success relies on how well they work together. The rider on the front of the quartet must keep the pace as high as possible but must not ride so fast that he drops any of his following teammates. The cyclists within a team must ride as close as possible to the rear wheel of the rider in front of them to gain every possible aerodynamic benefit. The front rider will swing up the track at the end of his “turn” and must smoothly rejoin his team in the fourth wheel position. The pace is then set by the rider now on the front of the quartet. The time is taken on the front wheel of the third rider across the line and it is often the case that only three riders will finish.

In the qualifying round each team rides alone on the track against the clock with the fastest eight teams going through. In the first round and finals, one team starts on each side of the track and they race each other and the clock. The fastest two winning teams of the first round contest the race for gold and silver and the other two winners race for bronze. In the finals the winner is determined by either catching the other team or recording the fastest time. A team is deemed to have been caught if the team chasing comes within one metre of the back wheel of the rider at the back of the rival team.

Omnium
This event will make its Olympic debut in London in 2012. It cycling’s version of a decathlon- a medley event involving a Flying Lap (250m time trial), Points Race (30km for men, 20km for women), Individual Pursuit (4km for men, 3km for women), Scratch Race (15km for men, 10km for women), Kilometre Time Trial (500m for women) and finally an Elimination Race (every two laps the last rider over the line is eliminated).

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Swimming

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 03:47
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Swimming Hero
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Swimming Preview Card
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
77
Silver Medals
73
Gold Medals
66
Sport Introduction

Australia and Olympic Swimming

The first Australian Olympic swimmer was Freddy Lane in Paris 1900. Swimming in the River Seine, Lane won the 200 metres freestyle and the obstacle race over the same distance. The next gold medals came in Stockholm 1912 when Sarah “Fanny” Durack and Wilhelmina “Mina” Wylie finished first and second in the inaugural women’s swimming race, the 100m freestyle. The Australasian team comprising Australians Cecil Healy, Harold Hardwick and Leslie Boardman and New Zealander Malcolm Champion won the men’s 4 x 200m freestyle relay.

At Paris 1924 Andrew “Boy” Charlton shattered the world record on the way to becoming the first of a long line of Australians to win the 1500m freestyle. Eight years later, Clare Dennis became the first Australian to win a medal in a non-freestyle swimming event when she won the women’s 200m breaststroke at Los Angeles 1932. The next gold medal came twenty years later in Helsinki when John Davies won the 200m breaststroke.

Melbourne 1956 saw Australia become the world’s top swimming nation by winning eight gold medals, including every freestyle event. The men’s winners were Jon Henricks (100m), Murray Rose (400m and 1500m) and the men’s 4 x 200m relay team of Henricks, Rose, John Devitt and Kevin O’Halloran. In the women’s events, Dawn Fraser won the 100m, Lorraine Crapp won the 400m and the team of Fraser, Crapp, Faith Leech and Sandra Morgan won the 4 x 100m relay. David Theile won the first of his two 100m backstroke gold medals. At Rome 1960 Fraser, Theile and Rose, in the 400m, repeated their Melbourne victories. John Devitt won the 100m freestyle and Jon Konrads the 1500m freestyle.

Dawn Fraser won the women's 100m freestyle for an unprecedented third time at Tokyo 1964 and Ian O’Brien (200m breaststroke), Kevin Berry (200m butterfly) and Robert Windle (1500m freestyle) also returned with gold medals. The rarefied atmosphere in Mexico City 1968 didn’t stop Michael Wenden taking on and beating the powerful Americans in the 100m and 200m freestyle. Lyn McClements was also a winner, in the women’s 100m butterfly.

At Munich 1972, Shane Gould dominated with medals in five individual events. Gould won the 200m and 400m freestyle and the 200m individual medley, took silver in the 800m and bronze in the 100m freestyle. Other winners in Munich were Gail Neall in the women’s 400m individual medley and Beverley Whitfield in the women’s 200m breaststroke. Brad Cooper won the men’s 400m freestyle after the original winner, Rick DeMont of the United States, was disqualified for taking a prohibited substance in his asthma medication.

Michelle Ford beat the powerful East German women to win the 800m freestyle at Moscow 1980. The men’s 4 x 100m medley team of Mark Kerry, Peter Evans, Mark Tonelli and Neil Brooks also won gold, gold, gold!  "Lucky lane 6" saw Jon Sieben win the 200m butterfly at Los Angeles 1984 and Duncan Armstrong do likewise in the 200m freestyle at Seoul 1988.

Kieren Perkins won the 1500m at Barcelona 1992 and Atlanta 1996. In finishing first in the 200m butterfly in Atlanta, Susie O’Neill became the first Australian woman since Michelle Ford to win an Olympic swimming title.

Sydney 2000 saw Australia return to the top echelon of Olympic swimming nations when five gold medals were won. Individual winners were Ian Thorpe (400m freestyle), Grant Hackett (1500m freestyle) and Susie O’Neill (200m freestyle). Relay titles came in the men’s 4 x 200m freestyle with Thorpe, Michael Klim, William Kirby and Todd Pearson and the men’s 4 x 100m freestyle with Thorpe, Klim, Chris Fydler and Ashley Callus.

Australian women dominated as a world swimming power at Athens 2004 with Jodie Henry winning the 100m freestyle and Petria Thomas the 100m butterfly together with relay wins in the 4 x 100m freestyle (Alice Mills, Libby Lenton, Thomas, Henry) and the 4 x 100m medley (Giaan Rooney, Leisel Jones, Thomas, Henry). In the men’s events, Ian Thorpe won the 200m and 400m freestyle titles to become Australia's greatest Olympic gold medal-winner with five, and Grant Hackett repeated his Sydney win in the 1500m. Overall Australia won 15 swimming medals (7 gold, 5 silver, 3 bronze).

Australia was again a dominant force at Beijing, taking a host of medals in the iconic 'Water Cube' venue. Stephanie Rice was one of the stars, taking three gold medals in the two individual medley events and the women's 4 x 200m freestyle (alongside Linda MacKenzie, Kylie Palmer and Bronte Barratt). The women also claimed gold in the 4 x 100m medley relay in a new world record (Emily Seebohm, Jess Schipper, Libby Trickett, Leisel Jones). Jones then took her total Olympic medal haul to eight, winning two gold and one silver with Trickett and Schipper also adding to their swags of medals. In the men's events there were no gold medals but some hard fought silvers went to Grant Hackett in the 1500m freestyle, Eamon Sullivan in the 100m freestyle, Brenton Rickard in the 200m breaststroke and the 4 x 100m medley relay team.

Australia’s gold in the pool at the London 2012 Games came from the women’s 4x100m freestyle relay team. Alicia Coutts, Cate Campbell, Brittany Elmslie and Melanie Schlanger raced the final on the opening night of competition in London.

Coutts and the Australians also won silver in the 4x100m medley and 4x200m freestyle relays, with the men’s 4x100m medley relay claiming bronze. Coutts was the star of the pool also winning silver in the 200m individual medley and bronze in the 100m butterfly. Australia’s other individual medallists in swimming were Christian Sprenger (silver - 100m breaststroke), James Magnussen (silver - 100m freestyle), Emily Seebohm (silver - 100m backstroke) and Bronte Barratt (bronze - 200m freestyle) to take the medal tally at the pool to 10 (1 gold, 6 silver, 3 bronze).

The Australian Swimming Team wrapped up their 2016 Olympic campaign with a total of 10 medals. Mack Horton won the first gold medal of the Games in the men’s 400m freestyle. The other individual gold went to 18-year-old debutant Kyle Chalmers who was in seventh place at the half way mark of the men’s 100m freestyle, before unleashing a whirlwind finish to become Australia’s youngest Olympic Swimming Champion since Ian Thorpe in 2000.

Other individual medals went to Mitch Larking who won silver in the 200m backstroke, Madeline Groves won silver in the women’s 200m butterfly and Emma McKeon won bronze in the women’s 100m butterfly. The team won medals in five of the six relays; gold in the women’s 4x100m freestyle, silver in the women’s 4x100m medley and in the women’s 4x200m free, bronze in the men’s 4x100m free, and in the men’s 4x100m medley.

A notable mention to Jarrod Poort who sprinted from the gun of the men’s 10km marathon open water race at Copacabana to open up a lead of almost a minute at the 2.5km mark. He held onto the lead for the first 9km of the event, before it unraveled for Poort and the pack eventually swallowed him up as he finished in 21st place.

Olympic History

Swimming has featured in every edition of the Games since 1896. Early Olympic events were conducted in freestyle (crawl) or breaststroke. Backstroke was added as of 1904. In the 1940s, breaststrokers discovered they could go much faster by bringing both arms overhead together. This was soon banned in the breaststroke, but became the butterfly stroke, which is now the fourth stroke used in competitive swimming.

Sport Format

Men and women now compete in 17 events each, involving four different strokes across a range of distances. Freestyle races cover 50m, 100m, 200m, 400m, 800m (women only), 1500m (men only) and 10km. The butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke races each cover 100m and 200m. All four strokes are used in the 200m and 400m individual medley events. The 4 x 100m freestyle, 4 x 200m freestyle and 4 x 100m medley relays complete the program.

Each race has a maximum of eight swimmers. Preliminary heats in the 50m, 100m and 200m lead to semi-finals and finals based on the fastest times. In relays and individual events of 400m or more, the eight fastest finishers in the preliminaries advance directly to the finals.

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Surfing

Submitted by admin on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 03:05
Referenced Sport Seasons
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Title
Surfing
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Surfing Preview Card
Medal Tally
Bronze Medals
0
Silver Medals
0
Gold Medals
0
Sport Introduction

Australia and Olympic Surfing

Ever since Hawaiian surfing legend Duke Kahanamoku hit Australian shores in 1915 surfing has exploded, becoming an iconic part of the national sporting landscape as well as a part of this nation’s way of life. With its deep connection to the Australian national identity, we have a storied history of success in the sport, with world champions inspiring more and more Australians to get involved.

At the first ever World Surfing Championship in 1964, held at Manly Beach in NSW, Australia took out both the men’s and women’s titles, with Midget Farrelly and Phyllis O’Donnell creating history to become surfing’s first world champions. This set a precedent that would continue into the modern day, with Australia consistently producing competitors of the highest calibre.

Aussie men have performed well throughout the sport’s history, producing several world champions. Mark Richards was the first Australian multiple title winner, taking out each of the championships from 1979 to 1983. He was followed by Tom Carroll, Damien Hardman, Mark Occhilupo and most recently, Mick Fanning and Joel Parkinson. Of these, Fanning is the most renowned. Fanning has won three world titles, his first coming in 2007, and is an icon in Australia, his stature in the country cemented by a close encounter with a shark during a competition in 2015.

While the Aussie men have enjoyed plenty of success, Australian women have done even better. Layne Beachley was one of the nation’s most dominant athletes in any sport winning seven of nine world championships, including six consecutively from 1998 to 2003. Beachley has been inducted into the Surfing Hall of Fame and the Sport Australia Hall of Fame and, along with Fanning, has been appointed as an Officer of the Order of Australia. Taking the torch from Beachley, Steph Gilmore has carved out an equally impressive career, producing six world titles from 2007 to 2014. The Aussie women have won 15 of the last 20 world championships with Australia’s newest champion, 22-year-old Tyler Wright, taking out the 2016 World Surf League Tour Championship.

Surfing will debut at Tokyo 2020 and in keeping with Australia’s rich history of success, we will be hoping for big things from our athletes.

The competition will take place at Japan’s Tsurigasaki Beach, located in the Greater Tokyo Area, Chiba Prefecture. The beach is an hour train ride from Tokyo and is already a popular spot for locals and travellers. It has previously been used as a competition site. 

Sport Format

Surfing is scored by a panel of judges, who measure a surfer’s ride by analysing the degree of difficulty, level of innovation, and the number and intricacy of manoeuvres performed on each ride. Each surfer is free to catch as many waves as they can within the allotted time and their two highest scores are totalled to calculate his/her final score. The winner is the person who scores the most points.

Given the dependence on catching waves in natural surf conditions, the ability of a competitor to read and adapt to the conditions is crucial to their success.

To earn a high score, a rider must perform with fluidity and grace, while also attacking waves with speed and power. The combination of these two seemingly conflicting properties makes for one of the most exciting spectator sports in the world today.